neonatal abstinence syndrome


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neonatal abstinence syndrome

n.
A disorder of newborns exposed to addictive drugs (especially opioids) either in the womb or at birth, characterized by a complex of symptoms associated with withdrawal, including high-pitched crying, tremor, inadequate food intake, fever, sweating, and vomiting.
References in periodicals archive ?
3) In-utero exposure of opioids results in Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS) consisting of symptoms of central nervous system irritability, autonomic nervous system dysfunction and gastrointestinal system disturbance.
In Tennessee, we have seen a nearly ten-fold rise in the incidence of babies born with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in the past ten years.
Subsequent research at the Children's Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, showed that in mothers exclusively breast-feeding, the babies were less likely to experience a neonatal abstinence syndrome and had a shorter hospital stay.
announced the release of a Government Accountability Office (GAO) study on neonatal abstinence syndrome.
The percentage of infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) was nearly twice as high in 2012 as it was 2011, reported Dr.
Their babies are also born heavier and at greater gestational age than those born to mothers on methadone, and require less morphine for neonatal abstinence syndrome and recover from it sooner, Dr.
16) Also, Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS), which is a regulatory dysfunction of the central and autonomic nervous system in the neonate, may result from gestational exposure to opioids and other substances of abuse leading to significant morbidity and prolonged hospital stay.
Educational outcomes in children born with opioid withdrawal: Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a constellation of drug withdrawal symptoms commonly seen in babies born to mothers who used opioids during pregnancy.
Infants born to women taking prescription opioids were more likely to have neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) if their mothers smoked tobacco or took selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs).
Key clinical point: Maintenance and long-acting prescription opioid use have higher risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).
These effects differ with respect to the substance ingested and can include neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), low birth weight, intrauterine fetal demise, and structural abnormalities such as gastroschisis.
Infants born to mothers with OUD are at risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), developing signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal after birth.