neonate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ne·o·nate

 (nē′ə-nāt′)
n.
A newborn infant, especially one less than four weeks old.

[neo- + Latin nātus, past participle of nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

neonate

(ˈniːəʊˌneɪt)
n
(Medicine) a newborn child, esp in the first week of life and up to four weeks old

ne•o•nate

(ˈni əˌneɪt)

n.
a newborn child, or one in its first 28 days.
[1930–35; neo- + -nate < Latin nātus born]
ne`o•na′tal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neonate - a baby from birth to four weeksneonate - a baby from birth to four weeks  
babe, baby, infant - a very young child (birth to 1 year) who has not yet begun to walk or talk; "the baby began to cry again"; "she held the baby in her arms"; "it sounds simple, but when you have your own baby it is all so different"
liveborn infant - infant who shows signs of life after birth
low-birth-weight baby, low-birth-weight infant - an infant born weighing less than 5.5 pounds (2500 grams) regardless of gestational age; "a low-birth-weight infant is at risk for developing lack of oxygen during labor"
postmature infant - infant born after 42 weeks of gestation; usually shows signs of placental insufficiency
preemie, premature baby, premature infant, premie, preterm baby, preterm infant - an infant that is born prior to 37 weeks of gestation
SGA infant, small-for-gestational-age infant - an infant whose size and weight are considerably less than the average for babies of the same age
stillborn infant - infant who shows no signs of life after birth
term infant - infant born at a gestational age between 37 and 42 completed weeks

neonate

noun
A very young child:
Translations

ne·o·nate

n. neonato-a, recién nacido-a, de seis semanas o menos de nacido-a.

neonate

n neonato -ta mf, recién nacido -da mf
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to breast feed the neonate needs to latch on and uses a different set of muscles as compared to bottle feeding10.
Blood samples were drawn from every neonate for culture sensitivity and measurement of serum C-reactive proteins.
Therefore, the present study was undertaken to assess and confirm the histological differences in the neuronal and longitudinal muscle layers of colon and rectum of adult and neonate rats.
Detailed physical examination of the neonate was done and recorded in the predesigned proforma.
One neonate in the standard group died from the consequences of severe perinatal asphyxia.
Pre-structured questionnaire was used to collect data of obstetric profile of mother, birth history of neonate, referral details in case of outborn baby, etc.
Compared with the recommended gestational weight gain, low weight gain was associated with a 5% higher risk of a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) neonate and a 5% higher risk of preterm birth.
Neonate survival times ranged from 30 minutes to 6 days after birth; 5 survived <1 hour, 1 died 48 hours after birth, and 1 survived for 6 days.
The skin of the neonate differs from that of the adult, in that it is thinner, delicate, has weaker intercellular attachments and produces fewer sweat and sebaceous gland secretions and is more susceptible to several infections.
EOS is primarily the result of intrapartum vertical transmission of bacteria from the mother to the neonate, either transplacentally or due to ascending infection from the genital tract.
The basic principles of anesthesia for the neonate **