neophilia


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neophilia

(ˌniːəʊˈfɪlɪə)
n
a tendency to like anything new; love of novelty
ˈneoˌphiliac n
References in periodicals archive ?
FA showed significant ability in improving the reduction in neophilia induced by CP treatment.
Secondly, neophilia, the fear of new foods, a concept introduced by psychologist Paul Rozin.
Furthermore, I will discuss the connection between neophilia with the Physical Education lesson and with medical exempts from the module, taking into consideration the fact that students develop in a different manner, according to their typology or to the activity they have (they participate at Physical Education lessons or they have medical exempts).
Jim Bolger has started the 2014 campaign in great form and his Neophilia, successful at Gowran and Leopardstown last year, has solid claims in the finale, the Helen Sheane Handicap, following her half-length second to Bertimont at Leopardstown last Sunday.
RAUDENBUSH, 2012, << Effects of Food Neophobia and Food Neophilia on Diet and Metabolic Processing>>, Food and Nutrition Sciences, 3: 1397-1403.
1), Elizabeth Miller argues that Morris considered avoidance of "waste" in all its senses a significant aspect of utopian life, and she interprets his essays, News from Nowhere, and his work for the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings as sustained attempts to reject "the neophilia, disposability, and planned obsolescence of capitalist production.
Neophilia in domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) and its implication for studies of dog cognition.
Therefore, although it has been beneficial that a link between cinema and modernism is no longer considered unworthy of scholarly attention, the risks of another special issue on cinema and modernism, with its associated idea of a 'special relationship', (17) include both discovering contexts that are just other forms and reducing modernism to neophilia.
And thank goodness for that, Winifred Gallagher would argue, for without the challenge of the new and our capacity for neophilia, we'd be nowhere.
That is, sex-differentiated patterns of parental investment lead the low-investment parent (typically the male) to relatively benefit from risk taking, neophilia, and exploratory behavior, while the high-investment parent, typically the female, will not find such behavior advantageous.
In this way, we can get the best out of the restless neophilia of the new media age, without sacrificing the cultural history of the moving image which is a vital part of the artistic legacy of ourselves and our students.