nerd


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nerd

also nurd  (nûrd)
n. Slang
1. A foolish, inept, or unattractive person.
2. A person who is single-minded or accomplished in scientific or technical pursuits but is felt to be socially inept.

[Origin unknown.]

nerd′y adj.
Word History: The first known occurrence of the word nerd, undefined but illustrated, dates from 1950 and is found in If I Ran the Zoo, a children's book by Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel). The book's narrator lists various imaginary creatures that he would keep in the zoo if he were allowed to run it, whatever objections other people might raise to his projects: "And then, just to show them, I'll sail to Ka-Troo And Bring Back an It-Kutch a Preep and a Proo A Nerkle a Nerd and a Seersucker, too!" (The nerd is a small humanoid creature looking comically angry.) The next known attestation of nerd appears in the October 8, 1951, issue of Newsweek, in which the slang of American youth is described: "In Detroit, someone who once would be called a drip or a square is now, regrettably, a nerd, or in a less severe case, a scurve." Authorities disagree on whether the two words—the name of Dr. Seuss's creature and the 1950s teenage slang term—are related. Some maintain that Dr. Seuss is the true originator of nerd and that the word nerd ("comically unpleasant creature") was picked up by the six-year-olds of 1950 and quickly passed on to their older siblings, who restricted and specified the meaning to the most comically obnoxious creature of their own class, a "square." Others claim that there is no connection between the two and propose other origins for nerd, such as an alteration of the word turd. It has also been suggested that nerd comes from Mortimer Snerd, the name of a dummy depicting a comically stupid yokel that was used by the American ventriloquist Edgar Bergen, one of the most popular performers of the 1930s and 1940s. In support of this theory, the noted scholar of American slang J.E. Lighter points out that Mortimer Snerd was used in a 1941 work as a nickname for a fellow of the kind that might today be called nerdy. Strong evidence for any of these theories is lacking, however, and the ultimate origin of nerd remains unknown.

nerd

(nɜːd) or

nurd

n
1. a boring or unpopular person, esp one obsessed with something specified: a computer nerd.
2. a stupid and feeble person
ˈnerdish, ˈnurdish adj
ˈnerdy, ˈnurdy adj

nerd

(nɜrd)

n. Slang.
1. a dull, ineffectual, or unattractive person.
2. a person dedicated to a nonsocial pursuit: a computer nerd.
[1950–55; of obscure origin]
nerd′y, adj. nerd•i•er, nerd•i•est.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nerd - an insignificant student who is ridiculed as being affected or boringly studiousnerd - an insignificant student who is ridiculed as being affected or boringly studious
assimilator, learner, scholar - someone (especially a child) who learns (as from a teacher) or takes up knowledge or beliefs
2.nerd - an intelligent but single-minded expert in a particular technical field or profession
expert - a person with special knowledge or ability who performs skillfully

nerd

nurd
noun (Slang)
1. bore, obsessive, anorak (informal), geek (informal), trainspotter (informal), dork (slang), wonk (informal), techie (informal) the outdated notion that users of the Internet are all sad computer nerds
2. fool, weed, drip (informal), sap (slang), wally (slang), sucker (slang), wimp (informal), booby, prat (slang), plonker (slang), twit (informal, chiefly Brit.), simpleton, dipstick (Brit. slang), schmuck (U.S. slang), divvy (Brit. slang), putz (U.S. slang), wuss (slang), eejit (Scot. & Irish), thicko (Brit. slang), dumb-ass (slang), doofus (slang, chiefly U.S.) No woman in her right mind would look twice at such a charmless little nerd.

nerd

also nurd
noun
1. Slang. One deficient in judgment and good sense:
Informal: dope, gander, goose.
2. Slang. An unpleasant, tiresome person:
Slang: drip, dweeb, jerk, pill, poop.
Translations
nörtti
nörd
オタク
nerd
nerd
čudak
nörd

nerd

[nɜːd] Npazguato/a m/f

nerd

[ˈnɜːrd] nbinoclard(e) m/f boutonneux/euse
computer nerd → informaticien boutonneux
the notion that users of the Internet are all sad computer nerds → la notion selon laquelle les utilisateurs d'Internet sont tous de tristes informaticiens boutonneux

nerd

n (inf)Dumpfbacke f (sl); computer nerdComputerfreak m (inf)

nerd

[nɜːd] n (fam, pej) → sfigato/a
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Smell sometimes played a part in nerd identification, along with a strange, excited babbling noise, a language now known as ancient geek.
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