nerve net

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nerve net

n.
A diffuse network of neurons that conducts impulses in all directions from the area stimulated, forming the nervous system in certain invertebrates such as the cnidarians.
References in periodicals archive ?
The cubomedusan nervous system includes a centralized system of four rhopalia interconnected by a nerve ring, and peripheral nerve nets in several parts of the medusa that serve motor, sensory, and likely modulatory functions (Skogh el al, 2006; Garm et ai, 2007a; Parkefelt and Ekstrom, 2009; Satterlie, 2011).
The swim system includes a cluster of pacemaker cells in each rhopalium; a conducting system in the nerve ring, which links the rhopalial pacemakers but also distributes excitatory impulses to the subumbrella; and a subumbrellar motor nerve net, which synaptically activates the circular muscle that lines the bell cavity (Satterlie, 1979; Eichinger and Satterlie, 2014).
The general theory: The oldest animals were the simplest, and once neural systems emerged, they evolved in a straightforward path from primitive nerve nets up to complex human brains.
Monochromatic grids of dots are constructed in shades of blue or green, and chain links, nerve nets, or vaguely floral patterns cover small wood panels.
Minsky has built a machine for simulating learning by nerve nets and has written a Princeton Ph.
each wavering color had its nerve nets (if one fired,
They use gap junctions and electrical conduction within the muscle sheets, although in some species nerve nets are still used to augment the activation and coordination of effectors (see Satterlie, 2002).
Despite the existence of a centralized nervous system in some cnidarians, most retain conducting components in the form of nerve nets (Satterlie, 2011).
While at Yale, Ted spent summers at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, where he investigated the functioning of nerve nets in coelenterates and the structure and physiology of giant nerve fibers in annelids.
In Chrysaora, immunoreactive nerve nets were associated with clusters of as few as two or three cnidocytes as well as with the larger assemblies of cnidocytes.
In the Anthozoa, effector activities appear to be coordinated solely by simple nerve nets utilizing chemical synapses (Josephson, 1974; Satterlie and Spencer, 1987).
Double labeling revealed two distinct nerve nets in the ectoderm.