ness


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ness

 (nĕs)
n.
A cape or headland.

[Middle English ness, from Old English næss; see nas- in Indo-European roots.]

ness

(nɛs)
n
(Physical Geography)
a. archaic a promontory or headland
b. (capital as part of a name): Orford Ness.
[Old English næs headland; related to Old Norse nes, Old English nasu nose]

Ness

(nɛs)
n
(Placename) Loch Ness a lake in NW Scotland, in the Great Glen: said to be inhabited by an aquatic monster. Length: 36 km (22.5 miles). Depth: 229 m (754 ft)

ness

(nɛs)

n.
a headland; promontory; cape.
[before 900; Middle English -nes(se) (in place names), in part continuing Old English næs, in part < Old Norse nes]

-ness

a suffix attached to adjectives and participles, forming abstract nouns denoting quality and state (and often, by extension, something exemplifying a quality or state): darkness; goodness; obligingness; preparedness.
[Middle English, Old English -nes, -nis, c. Old High German -nessi, Gothic -nassus; suffix orig. *-assus; -n- by false division of words with adj. and past participle stems ending in -n-; compare Old English efnes (later efen-nys) evenness]

Ness

(nɛs)
n.
Loch, a lake in SW Scotland, near Inverness. 23 mi. (37 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ness - a strip of land projecting into a body of waterness - a strip of land projecting into a body of water
dry land, ground, solid ground, terra firma, earth, land - the solid part of the earth's surface; "the plane turned away from the sea and moved back over land"; "the earth shook for several minutes"; "he dropped the logs on the ground"
spit, tongue - a narrow strip of land that juts out into the sea
References in classic literature ?
I have been frequently asked, when a slave, if I had a kind master, and do not remember ever to have given a negative answer; nor did I, in pursuing this course, consider myself as uttering what was absolutely false; for I always measured the kind- ness of my master by the standard of kindness set up among slaveholders around us.
My man was sallow of face, grizzled, unshaven, muddy on elbows and back; where the seams of his serge coat yawned you could see his white naked ness.
But why dwell on the wretched ness, the breathlessness, the degradation, the sense lessness, the weariness, the ridicule and humiliation and--and--the perspiration, of these moments?
Fracas was bad for busi ness, he affirmed; but, in truth, this specimen of portly, middle-aged manhood was of a timid dis position.
A few minutes before, there had only been three real things before me--the immensity of the night and space and nature, my own feeble- ness and anguish, and the near approach of death.
He surely wanted nothing from the wilder- ness but space to breathe in and to push on through.
It was curious to see his mingled eager- ness and reluctance to speak of Kurtz.
Yes, yes—you see the reason of the thing, and the wicked ness of shutting up an old man that has spent his days, as one may say, where he could always look into the windows of heaven.
Although he still hungered for the presence of the boy, who was the medium through which he expressed his love of man, the hunger became again a part of his loneli- ness and his waiting.
If she survive, the tender- ness will either be crushed out of her, or -- and the outward semblance is the same -- crushed so deeply into her heart that it can never show itself more.
He was frighted even to the marrow, and was minded to give order for your instant enlargement, and that you be clothed in fine raiment and lodged as befitted one so great; but then came Merlin and spoiled all; for he persuaded the king that you are mad, and know not whereof you speak; and said your threat is but foolish- ness and idle vaporing.
Now," says Ben Rogers, "what's the line of busi- ness of this Gang?