nested


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nest
nesting Japanese figures

nest

 (nĕst)
n.
1.
a. A structure or shelter made or used by a bird to hold its eggs during incubation and to house its young until fledged.
b. A structure or shelter in which other animals, such as reptiles, fish, or insects, deposit their eggs or tend their young.
c. A structure or complex built by ants, termites, or other social animals to house a colony.
d. A number of insects, birds, or other animals occupying a nest: attacked by a nest of hornets.
2. A place affording snug refuge or lodging; a home.
3.
a. A place or environment that fosters rapid growth or development, especially of something undesirable; a hotbed: a nest of criminal activity.
b. Those who occupy or frequent such a place or environment.
4.
a. A set of objects of graduated size that can be stacked together, each fitting within the one immediately larger: a nest of tables.
b. A cluster of similar things.
5. A group of weapons in a prepared position: a machine-gun nest.
v. nest·ed, nest·ing, nests
v.intr.
1. To build or occupy a nest.
2. To create and settle into a warm and secure refuge.
3. To hunt for birds' nests, especially in order to collect the eggs.
4. To fit one inside another.
v.tr.
1. To place in or as if in a nest.
2. To put snugly together or inside one another: to nest boxes.

[Middle English, from Old English; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

nested

(ˈnɛstɪd)
adj
(of similar objects) placed one inside the other
Translations

nested

adj (Comput) menuverschachtelt
References in periodicals archive ?
closed-canopy forest for 6 of 13 species that nested in both habitat types.
Starlings nested in 40 percent of boxes and 24 percent of tubes, whereas Eastern Bluebirds and Tree Swallows combined nested in 52 percent of boxes and 76 percent of tubes.
DISCUSSION--At both study areas, black-chinned hummingbirds nested primarily in the subcanopy forest layer, about 4 m from the ground, but we found striking differences in patterns of nest plants used.
These finding are in agreement to the studies done by Vijayan (1980) who reported that red-vented bulbul preferred to build nest in thorny trees and bushes and mostly nested in central position.
We predicted that owls would switch nests more frequently if they nested unsuccessfully in the previous nesting attempt or if there was a turnover in one of the resident owls.
two locations in central New York, including the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, Isodontia mexicana females nested in 8 and 9 mm diameter trap nests.
Federally-endangered interior least terns (Sterna antillarum) have nested at Gibson Lake in southwestern Indiana since 1986.