nesting


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nest
nesting Japanese figures

nest

 (nĕst)
n.
1.
a. A structure or shelter made or used by a bird to hold its eggs during incubation and to house its young until fledged.
b. A structure or shelter in which other animals, such as reptiles, fish, or insects, deposit their eggs or tend their young.
c. A structure or complex built by ants, termites, or other social animals to house a colony.
d. A number of insects, birds, or other animals occupying a nest: attacked by a nest of hornets.
2. A place affording snug refuge or lodging; a home.
3.
a. A place or environment that fosters rapid growth or development, especially of something undesirable; a hotbed: a nest of criminal activity.
b. Those who occupy or frequent such a place or environment.
4.
a. A set of objects of graduated size that can be stacked together, each fitting within the one immediately larger: a nest of tables.
b. A cluster of similar things.
5. A group of weapons in a prepared position: a machine-gun nest.
v. nest·ed, nest·ing, nests
v.intr.
1. To build or occupy a nest.
2. To create and settle into a warm and secure refuge.
3. To hunt for birds' nests, especially in order to collect the eggs.
4. To fit one inside another.
v.tr.
1. To place in or as if in a nest.
2. To put snugly together or inside one another: to nest boxes.

[Middle English, from Old English; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

nesting

(ˈnɛstɪŋ)
n
(Psychology) the tendency to arrange one's immediate surroundings, such as a work station, to create a place where one feels secure, comfortable, or in control
Translations

nesting

[ˈnestɪŋ]
A. N (Orn) → nidificación f, anidación f
B. CPD nesting box N (for hen) → nidal m, ponedero m; (for wild bird) → caja f anidadera
nesting season Népoca f de puesta, época f de nidificación, época f de anidación
nesting site Nzona f de nidificación, zona f de anidación

nesting

:
nesting box
nNistkasten m
nesting instinct
n (lit, fig)Nistinstinkt mor -trieb m
References in periodicals archive ?
Frequent burning (2-3 year intervals) maintains prairie grasslands in an open early successional stage, and appears to promote suitable nesting habitat.
In studies of avian nesting success, it is often of interest to estimate stage-specific daily survival probabilities of nests.
NESTING OF THE LOGGERHEAD SEA TURTLE (CARETTA CARETTA) ON DAUPHIN ISLAND, ALABAMA.
The introduction and popularity of metal t-posts for fencing replaced many of their former nesting sites.
Estimates of nesting failure due to predation were obtained from as many studies of warblers and finches as could be found in the literature and summarized in Appendix.
Prior to the CRP, nesting habitat for grassland birds in the Texas Southern High Plains (SHP) was restricted to playa lake vegetation (Fischer 1982) and other uncultivated areas.
According to the Federal government, we now have over 7,000 nesting pairs of bald eagles in the lower 48 states today," notes Al Cecere, President of the American Eagle Foundation.
For example, predation strongly influences egg coloration in ground nesting birds (Kilner, 2006) such that more cryptic eggs experience reduced predation (Colwell et al, 2011; Skrade and Dinsmore, 2013).
Information on the nesting success and monitoring of the factors influencing nesting success in cavity nesters is necessary for better conservation and population management of the species.
Studies of avian nest success in oak savannas are limited in number, but evidence exists for comparatively high nesting success (i.
We studied nesting activity of Kittlitz's Murrelets in the Kakagrak Hills, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, in northern Alaska during summer 2014.
During wildlife inventories in Kootenay National Park, Black Swifts were observed flying near Helmut Falls, Sinclair Canyon, and Marble Canyon; nesting was suspected at the latter site (Poll and others 1984).