netting


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net·ting

 (nĕt′ĭng)
n.
1. An openwork fabric; a net.
2. The act or process of making a net.
3. The act or process of fishing with a net.

netting

(ˈnɛtɪŋ)
n
any netted fabric or structure

net•ting

(ˈnɛt ɪŋ)

n.
any of various kinds of net fabric.
[1560–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.netting - a net of transparent fabric with a loose open weavenetting - a net of transparent fabric with a loose open weave
cheesecloth - a coarse loosely woven cotton gauze; originally used to wrap cheeses
gossamer - a gauze fabric with an extremely fine texture
meshwork, meshing, network, mesh, net - an open fabric of string or rope or wire woven together at regular intervals
2.netting - creating nets
weaving - creating fabric

netting

noun
An open fabric woven of strands that are interlaced and knotted at usually regular intervals:
Translations
شَبَكَه
síťovina
net
compensation monétaire de groupetulle
net
sieťovina

netting

[ˈnetɪŋ] N (= wire) → malla f; (= nets) → redes fpl (Sew) → malla f
see also wire C

netting

[ˈnɛtɪŋ] n
(for fence)grillage m
(= fabric) → voile m mosquito netting

netting

nNetz nt; (= wire netting)Maschendraht m; (= fabric)Netzgewebe nt; (for curtains etc) → Tüll m

netting

[ˈnɛtɪŋ] n (nets) → reti fpl; (mesh) → rete (also wire netting) (for fence) → rete metallica, reticolato; (fabric) → tulle m

net1

(net) noun
(any of various devices for catching creatures, eg fish, or for any of a number of other purposes, consisting of) a loose open material made of knotted string, thread, wire etc. a fishing-net; a hair-net; a tennis-net; (also adjective) a net curtain.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈnetted
to catch in a net. They netted several tons of fish.
ˈnetting noun
material made in the form of a net. wire netting.
ˈnetball noun
a team-game in which a ball is thrown into a net hanging high up on a pole.
ˈnetwork noun
1. anything in the form of a net, ie with many lines crossing each other. A network of roads covered the countryside.
2. a widespread organization. a radio network; television networks.
3. a system of computers that can exchange messages and information. The Internet is a global computer network
References in classic literature ?
As Ned remarked, it did look like a camping party, for in the canoes were tents, cooking utensils and, most important, mosquito canopies of heavy netting.
I was shown into a pretty but rather close drawing-room, and there sat Agnes, netting a purse.
Now leaning on the netting of the forecastle, now on the taffrail, I devoured with eagerness the soft foam which whitened the sea as far as the eye could reach; and how often have I shared the emotion of the majority of the crew, when some capricious whale raised its black back above the waves
The word is applied to many a woman who deserves it no otherwise than by netting a purse or covering a screen.
A fourth maitresse I sometimes saw who seemed to come daily to teach needlework, or netting, or lace-mending, or some such flimsy art; but of her I never had more than a passing glimpse, as she sat in the CARRE, with her frames and some dozen of the elder pupils about her, consequently I had no opportunity of studying her character, or even of observing her person much; the latter, I remarked, had a very English air for a maitresse, otherwise it was not striking; of character I should think; she possessed but little, as her pupils seemed constantly "en revolte" against her authority.
Thev go carriage by carriage, like fisher-folk netting a pool.
She is netting herself the sweetest cloak you can conceive.
The netting about the balloon-ended in cords attached to the ring, a big steel-bound hoop.
Rosamond rose and reached her netting, and then said, "Do you care about dancing at all?
There came a night when he raved, and the sound of a woman's name rang out from the open windows of the little bungalow, rang out through the drawn mosquito netting amongst the palm-trees, across the surf-topped sea to the great steamer which lay in the bay.
A little later I find you taking an immense interest in our new destroyers, trying, in fact, to induce young Conyers to explain our wire netting system, following him down to Portsmouth and doing your best to discover also the meaning of a new device attached to his destroyer.
Tudor had seen the effect on Joan and deliberately continued the flow of reminiscence, netting her in the glamour of romance.