neuroanatomy

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neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

 (no͝or′ō-ə-năt′ə-mē, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neu·ro·a·nat·o·mies
1. The branch of anatomy that deals with the nervous system.
2. The neural structure of a body part or organ: the neuroanatomy of the eye.

neu′ro·an′a·tom′i·cal (-ăn′ə-tŏm′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·a·nat′o·mist n.

neuroanatomy

(ˌnjʊərəʊəˈnætəmɪ)
n
(Anatomy) the study of the structure of the nervous system
ˌneuroaˈnatomist n

neu•ro•a•nat•o•my

(ˌnʊər oʊ əˈnæt ə mi, ˌnyʊər-)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the branch of anatomy dealing with the nervous system.
2. the nerve structure of an organism.
[1895–1900]
neu`ro•a•nat′o•mist, n.
neu`ro•an`a•tom′i•cal (-ˌæn əˈtɒm ɪ kəl) neu`ro•an`a•tom′ic, adj.

neuroanatomy

Medicine. the branch of anatomy that studies the anatomy of the nervous system. — neuroanatomical, adj.
See also: Nerves
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neuroanatomy - the anatomy of the nervous system
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

n. neuroanatomía, estudio anatómico del sistema nervioso.

neuroanatomy

n neuroanatomía
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1928 Ramon Santiago y Cajal, Spanish neuroanatomist, postulated that the neural setup of the human brain would be fixed and unable to change beyond the end of maturation of the brain around the age of 22-24 years.
Jill Bolte Taylor, a neuroanatomist from Harvard's Department of Psychiatry who suffered a stroke that caused her left brain hemisphere to hemorrhage and consequently lose its function.
She explains the intricate steps of losing cognitive abilities during a massive stroke through the lens of a Harvard-trained neuroanatomist who can also recount the anatomy and biology behind the traumatic event.
Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor explains, "We live in a world where we are taught from the start that we are thinking creatures that feel.
Franz Joseph Gall (circa 1810), a highly competent neuroanatomist, asserted that bumps and depressions on the skull reflected the underlying development or lack thereof of brain matter.
Pestilli was also part of the team that first traced this missing brain structure to an 1881 publication by Carl Wernicke, a German-Austrian neuroanatomist.
The number of people who have now watched the most successful TED talks number in the millions--for example, Ken Robinson's talk on 'How Schools Kill Creativity' has 31 million views (2006) and the neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor's talk 'My Stroke of Insight' has 16 million views (2008).
A neuroanatomist by the name of Heinrich Wilhelm Gottfried von Waldeyer-Hartz (1836-1921) was directing the latter, and he, together with psychologist Carl Stumpf, served on a committee established to get the Station up and running.
She has teamed up with others from UCSF, including collaborators Peter Ohara, PhD, a neuroanatomist, and Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon, to develop a method for delivering small-molecules to a specific target group of cells for treatment of pain.
Niels Stensen (1638-1686): scientist, neuroanatomist, and saint.
However, Henry Evrard, neuroanatomist at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany, has now discovered that the VEN also occurs in the insula of macaque monkeys.
And next in Chapter LXXX, "The Nut," we come to Melville the neuroanatomist.