neuroanatomy

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neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

 (no͝or′ō-ə-năt′ə-mē, nyo͝or′-)
n. pl. neu·ro·a·nat·o·mies
1. The branch of anatomy that deals with the nervous system.
2. The neural structure of a body part or organ: the neuroanatomy of the eye.

neu′ro·an′a·tom′i·cal (-ăn′ə-tŏm′ĭ-kəl) adj.
neu′ro·a·nat′o·mist n.

neuroanatomy

(ˌnjʊərəʊəˈnætəmɪ)
n
(Anatomy) the study of the structure of the nervous system
ˌneuroaˈnatomist n

neu•ro•a•nat•o•my

(ˌnʊər oʊ əˈnæt ə mi, ˌnyʊər-)

n., pl. -mies.
1. the branch of anatomy dealing with the nervous system.
2. the nerve structure of an organism.
[1895–1900]
neu`ro•a•nat′o•mist, n.
neu`ro•an`a•tom′i•cal (-ˌæn əˈtɒm ɪ kəl) neu`ro•an`a•tom′ic, adj.

neuroanatomy

Medicine. the branch of anatomy that studies the anatomy of the nervous system. — neuroanatomical, adj.
See also: Nerves
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neuroanatomy - the anatomy of the nervous system
anatomy, general anatomy - the branch of morphology that deals with the structure of animals
Translations

neu·ro·a·nat·o·my

n. neuroanatomía, estudio anatómico del sistema nervioso.

neuroanatomy

n neuroanatomía
References in periodicals archive ?
Pestilli was also part of the team that first traced this missing brain structure to an 1881 publication by Carl Wernicke, a German-Austrian neuroanatomist.
She has teamed up with others from UCSF, including collaborators Peter Ohara, PhD, a neuroanatomist, and Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, a neurosurgeon, to develop a method for delivering small-molecules to a specific target group of cells for treatment of pain.
However, Henry Evrard, neuroanatomist at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany, has now discovered that the VEN also occurs in the insula of macaque monkeys.
Although I am not a neuroanatomist, the cerebral cortex grows outward, so we lay down the outer layers of cortex, which have the highest intellect and abstract function systems, last.
In 1917, the British neuroanatomist Grafton Elliot Smith and the psychologist Tom Pear challenged this view.
To offer perhaps the most dramatic documented example, Harvard neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor described her own recovery from a massive left-hemisphere stroke, detailing her literal rebuilding of neural tissues and connections (see Bolte Taylor, 2009).
IN 1996, I WAS A NEUROANATOMIST at Harvard Medical School, studying the brain particularly as it relates to schizophrenia, because I have a brother diagnosed with the brain disorder.
But Taylor was a brain scientist, a neuroanatomist at Harvard's Brain Tissue Resource Center.
Coauthors of the book include a neuroanatomist, an adult neurologist, and a pediatric neurologist.