neuronitis


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Related to neuronitis: Vestibular neuritis
Translations

neu·ron·i·tis

n. infl. de un neurón.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is the most frequent form of vestibular dysfunction, followed by Meniere's disease and vestibular neuronitis.
Patients were excluded if they had (a) concomitant ear disease or conditions including chronic otitis media, Meniere disease, acute labyrinthitis, acute vestibular neuronitis, otosclerosis, perilymphatic fistula, cerebrovascular disease, or spontaneous nystagmus on physical examination (no consistent provoking factor) or (b) concomitant illness or injury prohibiting participation in DHP or CRP (e.
Louis encephalitis viruses, human endogenous retroviruses, HIV-1 infection, tick-borne encephalitis, measles, mumps and rubella, rabies, influenza, hepatic viruses; and other topics, such as viral infections in immunocompromised hosts, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, vaccines and viral/toxin-associated neurologic infections, encephalitis lethargica, and Bell's palsy and vestibular neuronitis.
In a patient with a first-ever attack of acute spontaneous vertigo persisting for several hours, the main differential diagnosis of acute vestibular neuronitis is cerebellar infarction.
The common peripheral vestibular disorders include Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV), Meniere's disease, Vestibular Neuronitis, Acoustic neuroma, Labyrinthitis, Ototoxicity, Post trauma and Perilymph fistula.
There were 35 cases of Meniere's disease, 26 cases of heart diseases, 26 cases caused by abnormal blood pressure, 25 cases of psychological disorders, 21 cases of infectious diseases, 20 cases of syncope, 17 cases of sudden deafness, 11 cases of vestibular neuronitis, 7 cases of other ear diseases, 6 cases of migrainous vertigo and 5 cases of vertebrobasilar infarction.
From a neuro-otologic standpoint, make a point of separating past and present problems (ie, not the vestibular neuronitis, BPPV, etc.
Lipoprotein (a) and acute-phase response in patients with vestibular neuronitis.
What I have is Acute Neuronitis, which is related to vertigo.
In vestibular neuronitis (involving the vestibular system only) or labyrinthitis (involving the entire labyrinth: vestibular system and cochlea with associated hearing loss) one inner ear does not function and the relative 'overstimulation' of stimuli from the normal ear to the brain produces excessive vertigo.