neutron star


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

neutron star

n.
A celestial body having a mass of 1.4 to 2.1 solar masses contained within a radius of only about 10 kilometers (6 miles), formed when a massive star collapses with sufficient energy to force all of its electrons into the nuclei that they orbit, where they react with protons, leaving only neutrons. Neutron stars are powerful sources of radio waves and x-rays.

neutron star

n
(Astronomy) a star that has collapsed under its own gravity to a diameter of about 10 to 15 km. It is composed mostly of neutrons, has a mass of between 1.4 and about 3 times that of the sun, and a density in excess of 1017 kilograms per cubic metre

neu′tron star`



n.
an extremely dense, compact star composed primarily of neutrons, esp. the collapsed core of a supernova.
[1934]

neutron star

A celestial object consisting of an extremely dense mass of neutrons, formed by the forcing together of protons and electrons in the collapse of a massive star. Most neutron stars rotate very rapidly. Many have powerful magnetic fields that focus radio waves, light, and other radiation into two beams that point outward from the magnetic poles. See more at star.

neutron star

The smallest but densest kind of star, apparently resulting from a supernova explosion that compressed the star’s particles into subatomic neutrons. A neutron star 15 mi (25 km) across can equal the Sun’s mass.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neutron star - a star that has collapsed under its own gravity; it is composed of neutrons
pulsar - a degenerate neutron star; small and extremely dense; rotates very fast and emits regular pulses of polarized radiation
star - (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior
Translations
Neutronenstern
neutronitähti
stella neutronica
neutronstjärna
References in periodicals archive ?
However, Integral's observations revealed that a slow-spinning neutron star, with an unusually strong magnetic field has likely just begun feeding on material from a neighboring red giant star.
A new study, led by California Institute of Technology (Caltech), has revealed more information about ULXs and data acquired from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has helped to identify a fourth ULX as a neutron star the first in in the Whirlpool galaxy, also known as M51 and found new clues about how these objects can shine so brightly.
Astronomers have known neutron star binaries exist since 1974, when Russell Hulse and Joseph Taylor (then at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst) discovered the first one, PSR 1913+16.
These objects are so dense that just a teaspoon of neutron star material would have a mass of about a billion tons.
At just 12-15 miles (about 20-25 kilometers) across and completely full of neutrons, a neutron star is so dense that a cubic centimeter weighs a million metric tons.
You're left with an extremely exotic object, this neutron star.
But no list would be complete without black holes and the black hole's less-dense cousins, the neutron star.
The recent measurement for the Shapiro delay of light from a binary millisecond pulsar has discovered a neutron star with a mass of about two solar masses [4]; and other measurements have found the radii of some neutron stars to be less than 10 km [5-7].
Alternatively, the neutron star might be shot out of the supernova into its companion.
TZOs are thought to be formed by the interaction of two massive stars-a red supergiant and a neutron star formed during a supernova explosion-in a close binary system.
WASHINGTON (CyHAN)- A pulsar is a neutron star that emits beams of radiation that sweep through Earth's line of sight.
A neutron star is the compressed core left behind when a star weighing less than about 30 times the sun's mass explodes as a supernova.