newsy

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Also found in: Thesaurus.

news·y

 (no͞o′zē, nyo͞o′-)
adj. news·i·er, news·i·est Informal
Full of news; informative.

news′i·ness n.

newsy

(ˈnjuːzɪ)
adj, newsier or newsiest
full of news, esp gossipy or personal news: a newsy letter.
ˈnewsiness n

news•y

(ˈnu zi, ˈnyu-)

adj. news•i•er, news•i•est.
full of news: a long, newsy letter.
[1825–35]
news′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.newsy - full of news; "a newsy letter"
informatory, informative - providing or conveying information
2.newsy - prone to friendly informal communication
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
Translations
حافِل بالأخْبار
plný novinek
fuld af nyheder
sok érdekes hírt tartalmazó
fullur af fréttum
plný noviniek
haber dolu

newsy

[ˈnjuːzɪ] ADJlleno de noticias

newsy

adj (+er) (inf)voller Neuigkeiten

newsy

[ˈnjuːzɪ] adj (fam) → ricco/a di notizie

news

(njuːz) noun singular
a report of, or information about, recent events. You can hear the news on the radio at 9 o'clock; Is there any news about your friend?; (also adjective) a news broadcast.
ˈnewsy adjective
full of news. a newsy letter.
ˈnewsagent noun
(American news dealer) a person who has a shop selling newspapers (and usually other goods).
ˈnewscast noun
a broadcast of news in a radio or television programme.
ˈnewscaster noun
a person who presents a news broadcast.
ˈnewsletter noun
a sheet containing news issued to members of a group, organization etc.
ˈnewspaper noun
a paper, printed daily or weekly, containing news etc. a daily newspaper.

news is singular: No news is good news .
References in periodicals archive ?
The wonkosphere's other big weakness derives, ironically, from one of its greatest strengths: its newsiness.
From the Journal's perspective, an embargo creates a certain orderliness and works to preserve the newsiness of the Journal.
The move emphasized the magazine's orientation toward politics and its sense of newsiness, attributes that would distinguish TNR as other "serious" publications found themselves increasingly subject to the academicization of intellectual life in postwar America.