niceness


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nice

 (nīs)
adj. nic·er, nic·est
1. Pleasing and agreeable in nature: had a nice time; a nice person.
2. Having a pleasant or attractive appearance: a nice dress; a nice face.
3. Exhibiting courtesy and politeness: a nice gesture.
4. Of good character and reputation; respectable.
5. Overdelicate or fastidious; fussy.
6. Showing or requiring great precision or sensitive discernment; subtle: a nice distinction; a nice sense of style.
7. Done with delicacy and skill: a nice bit of craft.
8. Used as an intensive with and: nice and warm.
9. Obsolete
a. Wanton; profligate: "For when mine hours / Were nice and lucky, men did ransom lives / Of me for jests" (Shakespeare).
b. Affectedly modest; coy: "Ere ... / The nice Morn on th' Indian steep, / From her cabin'd loop-hole peep" (John Milton).

[Middle English, foolish, from Old French, from Latin nescius, ignorant, from nescīre, to be ignorant; see nescience.]

nice′ly adv.
nice′ness n.

Nice

 (nēs)
A city of southeast France on the Mediterranean Sea northeast of Cannes. Controlled by various royal houses after the 1200s, the city was finally ceded to France in 1860. It is the leading resort city of the French Riviera.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.niceness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usageniceness - a courteous manner that respects accepted social usage
good manners, courtesy - a courteous manner
2.niceness - the quality of nice
pleasantness, sweetness - the quality of giving pleasure; "he was charmed by the sweetness of her manner"; "the pleasantness of a cool breeze on a hot summer day"
nastiness - the quality of being unpleasant; "I flinched at the nastiness of his wound"
3.niceness - the quality of being difficult to detect or analyze; "you had to admire the subtlety of the distinctions he drew"
difficultness, difficulty - the quality of being difficult; "they agreed about the difficulty of the climb"

niceness

noun kindness, charm, goodness, decency, friendliness, amiability, pleasantness, agreeableness, likableness or likeableness I think it was Joe's niceness and kindness that attracted me.
Translations

niceness

[ˈnaɪsnɪs] N
1. (= pleasantness) [of place, thing] → lo agradable
2. (= likeableness) [of person] → simpatía f
3. (= kindness) → amabilidad f
4. (= politeness) → finura f
5. (= subtlety) → sutileza f

niceness

[ˈnaɪsnɪs] n [person] → gentillesse f

niceness

n
(= pleasantness: of person, behaviour) → Nettigkeit f; (= nice appearance)nettes or hübsches Aussehen; (= skilfulness)Qualität f, → Feinheit f
(= subtlety)Feinheit f, → Genauigkeit f
(= fastidiousness)anspruchsvolle Art, Pingeligkeit f (inf), → Heikelkeit f (dial)
References in classic literature ?
Nay, Seneca adds niceness and satiety: Cogita quamdiu eadem feceris; mori velle, non tantum fortis aut miser, sed etiam fastidiosus potest.
In former years Paulvitch had been a fastidious scoundrel; but ten years of hideous life among the cannibals of Africa had eradicated the last vestige of niceness from his habits.
They were not worldly young fellows, but fraternizing with dairy-folk would have struck unpleasantly upon their biassed niceness, apart from their view of the match.
Almost unconsciously she had now undone the parcel he had just put into her hand, and seeing before her, in all the niceness of jewellers' packing, a plain gold chain, perfectly simple and neat, she could not help bursting forth again, "Oh, this is beautiful indeed
Bird-like in her love of individual freedom, the last woman in the world to be bullied in her affections, she keenly appreciated the niceness of his attitude.
To his mother it perhaps appeared as a marriage to some lady of means who could not resist her boy's niceness.
To her amazement she found that some "quite nice" people were saturated with Wells, and that this accessibility to ideas was the secret of their niceness.
One doesn't come to Italy for niceness," was the retort; "one comes for life.
I affect no niceness of conscience--I have not found any nice standards necessary yet to measure your actions by, sir.
Christianity is not to vanish into a cloud of niceness.
Bramen finds that American niceness assumes that Americans are decent and good-natured people with the best of intentions who are gifted with a permanent get-out-of-jail-free card exempting them from acknowledging the consequences of their actions.
Scott argues that the current business environment has become too focused on "being nice," to the point that even constructive disagreements are discouraged and candid feedback is never offered; the insistence on niceness, she asserts, keeps people and company performance from being its best.