nicey-nicey

nicey-nicey

(ˌnaɪsɪˈnaɪsɪ)
adj, adv
informal trying to be pleasant, but in a way that suggests artifice or exaggeration; ingratiating(ly)
References in periodicals archive ?
Thanks to its penchant for mercilessly demeaning the poor defenceless wannabes, The Apprentice has always been an awkward fit at the nicey-nicey BBC.
We need players who are going to fight fire with fire; who aren't just going to be all nicey-nicey.
In daylight, he is a nicey-nicey supporter of Alzheimer's charities.
You want to see a bit of spikiness as a nicey-nicey attitude gets you nowhere in professional sport.
We also want to play competitive cricket, we don't want it to be too nicey-nicey and everyone just saying we're playing in the right spirit.
Muddied line' "We also want to play competitive cricket, we don't want it to be too nicey-nicey.
While Charles and Camilla are regressing from middle age couple to giggling teenagers, nicey-nicey Wills and Kate, with their love of the quiet life, seem to be getting old before their time.
You can't play it down, be all nicey-nicey and pretend it's going to be like a testimonial.
Staging nicey-nicey annual awards cannot gloss over widening cracks.
The former drama student said: "I don't do one-liners, it's all very anecdotal and very nicey-nicey.
We had just played 93 minutes of a tough football match and it wasn't going to be nicey-nicey.
It's not about being nicey-nicey or just giving employees what they want," says Lora Lea Mock, founder and president of Professional Recruiters.