niche


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
niche
niche in the façade of Merchant Seamen's Hospital Houses
North Yorkshire, England

niche

 (nĭch, nēsh)
n.
1. A recess in a wall, as for holding a statue or urn.
2. A cranny, hollow, or crevice, as in rock.
3.
a. A situation or activity specially suited to a person's interests, abilities, or nature: found her niche in life.
b. A special area of demand for a product or service: "One niche that is approaching mass-market proportions is held by regional magazines" (Brad Edmondson).
4. Ecology
a. The function or position of an organism or population within an ecological community.
b. The range of environmental conditions within which the members of a given species can survive and reproduce.
tr.v. niched, nich·ing, nich·es
To place in a niche.

[French, from Old French, from nichier, to nest (from Vulgar Latin *nīdicāre, from Latin nīdus, nest; see sed- in Indo-European roots) or from Old Italian nicchio, seashell (perhaps from Latin mītulus, mussel).]
Usage Note: Niche was borrowed from French in the 1600s and Anglicized shortly thereafter. Many French borrowings have troublesome pronunciations, because most English speakers can't speak French very well, if at all. Niche presents an interesting variation of this pattern. It was quickly converted into a comfortable English-sounding word, pronounced (nĭch) and rhyming with itch. But in the 1900s, people familiar with French thought that a word that looked French should sound French, and so the Francophone pronunciation (nēsh), rhyming with quiche, was revived. Some Americans consider this pronunciation to be an affectation; however, it is standard in Britain and is included in most American dictionaries. The hybrid pronunciation (nēch), which takes something from each version to rhyme with leech, is less favored, perhaps because it makes one look as though one doesn't know what language one is speaking. In our 2005 survey, 69 percent of the Usage Panel found it unacceptable.

niche

(nɪtʃ; niːʃ)
n
1. (Architecture) a recess in a wall, esp one that contains a statue
2. (Mountaineering) any similar recess, such as one in a rock face
3. a position particularly suitable for the person occupying it: he found his niche in politics.
4. (Commerce) (modifier) relating to or aimed at a small specialized group or market
5. (Biology) ecology the role of a plant or animal within its community and habitat, which determines its activities, relationships with other organisms, etc
vb
(tr) to place (a statue) in a niche; ensconce (oneself)
[C17: from French, from Old French nichier to nest, from Vulgar Latin nīdicāre (unattested) to build a nest, from Latin nīdus nest]

niche

(nɪtʃ)

n., v. niched, nich•ing. n.
1. a recess in a wall or the like, usu. semicircular in plan and arched, as for a statue.
2. a suitable place or position: to find one's niche in the world.
3. the position and function of a particular species or population in an ecological community.
4. a distinct segment of a market.
adj.
5. of or pertaining to a market niche: niche advertising.
v.t.
6. to place in a niche.
[1605–15; < French, Middle French, n. derivative of nicher to make a nest < Vulgar Latin *nīdiculāre, v. derivative of Latin nīdus nest]

niche

(nĭch, nēsh)
The function or position of a species within an ecological community. A species's niche includes the physical environment to which it has become adapted as well as its role as producer and consumer of food resources.

niche


Past participle: niched
Gerund: niching

Imperative
niche
niche
Present
I niche
you niche
he/she/it niches
we niche
you niche
they niche
Preterite
I niched
you niched
he/she/it niched
we niched
you niched
they niched
Present Continuous
I am niching
you are niching
he/she/it is niching
we are niching
you are niching
they are niching
Present Perfect
I have niched
you have niched
he/she/it has niched
we have niched
you have niched
they have niched
Past Continuous
I was niching
you were niching
he/she/it was niching
we were niching
you were niching
they were niching
Past Perfect
I had niched
you had niched
he/she/it had niched
we had niched
you had niched
they had niched
Future
I will niche
you will niche
he/she/it will niche
we will niche
you will niche
they will niche
Future Perfect
I will have niched
you will have niched
he/she/it will have niched
we will have niched
you will have niched
they will have niched
Future Continuous
I will be niching
you will be niching
he/she/it will be niching
we will be niching
you will be niching
they will be niching
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been niching
you have been niching
he/she/it has been niching
we have been niching
you have been niching
they have been niching
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been niching
you will have been niching
he/she/it will have been niching
we will have been niching
you will have been niching
they will have been niching
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been niching
you had been niching
he/she/it had been niching
we had been niching
you had been niching
they had been niching
Conditional
I would niche
you would niche
he/she/it would niche
we would niche
you would niche
they would niche
Past Conditional
I would have niched
you would have niched
he/she/it would have niched
we would have niched
you would have niched
they would have niched
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.niche - a position particularly well suited to the person who occupies it; "he found his niche in the academic world"
station, place - proper or designated social situation; "he overstepped his place"; "the responsibilities of a man in his station"; "married above her station"
2.niche - a small concavity
pharyngeal recess - a small recess in the wall of the pharynx
concave shape, concavity, incurvation, incurvature - a shape that curves or bends inward
3.niche - an enclosure that is set back or indented
alcove, bay - a small recess opening off a larger room
apse, apsis - a domed or vaulted recess or projection on a building especially the east end of a church; usually contains the altar
cinerarium, columbarium - a niche for a funeral urn containing the ashes of the cremated dead
enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
fireplace, hearth, open fireplace - an open recess in a wall at the base of a chimney where a fire can be built; "the fireplace was so large you could walk inside it"; "he laid a fire in the hearth and lit it"; "the hearth was black with the charcoal of many fires"
mihrab - (Islam) a niche in the wall of a mosque that indicates the direction of Mecca
4.niche - (ecology) the status of an organism within its environment and community (affecting its survival as a species)
bionomics, environmental science, ecology - the branch of biology concerned with the relations between organisms and their environment
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"

niche

noun
1. recess, opening, corner, hollow, nook, alcove There was a niche in the rock where the path ended.
2. position, calling, place, slot (informal), vocation, pigeonhole (informal) Perhaps I will find my niche in a desk job.

niche

noun
The proper or designated location:
Translations
مِشْكاه، فَجْوَة في جِدارمَكان مُلائِم
místečkonikapevné místo
niche
sess, rétt hillaveggskot
tinkama vieta
īsta/piemērota vietaniša
nikavhodné miesto
duvar girintisinişuygun yer

niche

[niːʃ] N (Archit) → nicho m, hornacina f (fig) → hueco m
to find a niche for o.shacerse con una buena posición or un huequito

niche

[ˈniːʃ] n
(in wall)niche f
(in market)niche f, créneau m
to find a niche in the market → trouver une niche sur le marché
(for person)créneau m
to find one's niche → trouver son créneau
to carve a niche for o.s. → se trouver un créneauniche market ncréneau m
a profitable niche market → un créneau rentable

niche

n (Archit) → Nische f; (fig)Plätzchen nt; to carve a niche for oneselfeine Nische für sich finden; niche market (Comm) → Nischenmarkt m

niche

[niːʃ] n (Archit) → nicchia (Ecology) → nicchia ecologica (fig) to find a niche for o.s.trovare una propria collocazione

niche

(nitʃ) , (niːʃ) noun
1. a hollow in a wall for a statue, ornament etc.
2. a suitable place in life. He found his niche in engineering.

niche

n. nicho, depresión o defecto pequeño esp. en la pared de un órgano hueco.
References in classic literature ?
If, after long lapse of years, the right seems to be in our power, we find no niche to set it in.
Mary had a milder and more open countenance than Blanche; softer features too, and a skin some shades fairer (Miss Ingram was dark as a Spaniard)--but Mary was deficient in life: her face lacked expression, her eye lustre; she had nothing to say, and having once taken her seat, remained fixed like a statue in its niche.
His eyes also were bound round with a band of leather, as though to hide something from their gaze, one foot was gone, one hung over the edge of the niche towards the floor, and beneath it on the floor, red with rust, lay the blade of a broken spear.
stands quiet in his niche, though I should forget my orisons in killing a fat buck I stay out of my cell sometimes a night, doing I wot not what Saint Dunstan never complains a quiet master he is, and a peaceful, as ever was made of wood.
Hence--" Here Trefusis opened a drawer, took out a pistol, and fired at the Hebe in the farthest niche.
Walk on till you come to a niche in a terrace where stands a lighted lamp.
In an instant he had reached the extremity of the niche, and finding his progress arrested by the rock, stood stupidly bewildered.
And D'Artagnan, making himself as small as he could, concealed himself in the darkest side of the street near a stone bench placed at the back of a niche.
The Monte Pincio seemed a vast amphitheatre filled with spectators; the balconies of the two churches at the corner of the Via del Babuino and the Via di Ripetta were crammed; the steps even seemed a parti-colored sea, that was impelled towards the portico; every niche in the wall held its living statue.
At a small elevation above the ground, set in a rich framework of verdure, there appeared a niche, spacious enough to admit a human figure, with freedom for such gestures as spontaneously accompany earnest thought and genuine emotion.
My cold berth would swallow up like a chilly burial niche my bodily shivers and my mental excitement.
This ledge projected about eighteen inches, and was not more than a foot wide, while a niche in the cliff just above it, gave it a rude resemblance to one of the hollow-backed chairs used by our ancestors.