nick


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nick

 (nĭk)
n.
1. A shallow notch, cut, or indentation on an edge or a surface: nicks in the table; razor nicks on his chin.
2. Chiefly British Slang A prison or police station.
3. Printing A groove down the side of a piece of type used to ensure that it is correctly placed.
tr.v. nicked, nick·ing, nicks
1.
a. To cut a nick or notch in.
b. To cut into and wound slightly: A sliver of glass nicked my hand.
2. To cut short; check: nicked an impulse to flee.
3. Slang To cheat, especially by overcharging.
4. Chiefly British Slang
a. To steal.
b. To arrest.
Idiom:
in the nick of time
Just at the critical moment; just in time.

[Middle English nik, possibly alteration (influenced by nokke, notch) of niche; see niche.]

nick

(nɪk)
n
1. a small notch or indentation on an edge or surface
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a groove on the shank of a printing type, used to orientate type and often to distinguish the fount
3. Brit a slang word for prison, police station
4. in good nick informal in good condition
5. in the nick of time at the last possible moment; at the critical moment
vb
6. (tr) to chip or cut
7. (tr) slang chiefly
a. to steal
b. to take into legal custody; arrest
8. informal (often foll by: off) to move or depart rapidly
9. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) to divide and reset (certain of the tail muscles of a horse) to give the tail a high carriage
10. (tr) to guess, catch, etc, exactly
11. (Agriculture) (intr) (of breeding stock) to mate satisfactorily
12. nick someone for slang US and Canadian to defraud someone to the extent of
[C15: perhaps changed from C14 nocke nock]

nick

(nɪk)
n
(Telecommunications) computing an alias adopted by a member of a chatroom or forum; nickname
[short for nickname]

nick

(nɪk)
n.
1. a small notch, groove, chip, or the like.
2. a small dent or wound.
3. a small groove on one side of the shank of a printing type.
4. a break in a strand of a DNA or RNA molecule.
5. Brit. Slang. prison.
v.t.
6. to cut into or through.
7. to hit or injure slightly.
8. to make a nick or nicks in (something); notch, groove, or chip.
9. to incise certain tendons at the root of (a horse's tail) to give it a higher carrying position; make an incision under the tail of (a horse).
10. to hit, guess, catch, etc., exactly.
11. Slang. to trick, cheat, or defraud.
12. Brit. Slang.
a. to arrest (a criminal or suspect).
b. to capture; nab.
c. to steal.
Idioms:
in the nick of time, at the right moment and no sooner; at the last possible moment.
[1475–85; obscurely akin to Old English gehnycned wrinkled, Old Norse hnykla to wrinkle]

nick


Past participle: nicked
Gerund: nicking

Imperative
nick
nick
Present
I nick
you nick
he/she/it nicks
we nick
you nick
they nick
Preterite
I nicked
you nicked
he/she/it nicked
we nicked
you nicked
they nicked
Present Continuous
I am nicking
you are nicking
he/she/it is nicking
we are nicking
you are nicking
they are nicking
Present Perfect
I have nicked
you have nicked
he/she/it has nicked
we have nicked
you have nicked
they have nicked
Past Continuous
I was nicking
you were nicking
he/she/it was nicking
we were nicking
you were nicking
they were nicking
Past Perfect
I had nicked
you had nicked
he/she/it had nicked
we had nicked
you had nicked
they had nicked
Future
I will nick
you will nick
he/she/it will nick
we will nick
you will nick
they will nick
Future Perfect
I will have nicked
you will have nicked
he/she/it will have nicked
we will have nicked
you will have nicked
they will have nicked
Future Continuous
I will be nicking
you will be nicking
he/she/it will be nicking
we will be nicking
you will be nicking
they will be nicking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been nicking
you have been nicking
he/she/it has been nicking
we have been nicking
you have been nicking
they have been nicking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been nicking
you will have been nicking
he/she/it will have been nicking
we will have been nicking
you will have been nicking
they will have been nicking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been nicking
you had been nicking
he/she/it had been nicking
we had been nicking
you had been nicking
they had been nicking
Conditional
I would nick
you would nick
he/she/it would nick
we would nick
you would nick
they would nick
Past Conditional
I would have nicked
you would have nicked
he/she/it would have nicked
we would have nicked
you would have nicked
they would have nicked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nick - an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)nick - an impression in a surface (as made by a blow)
blemish, mar, defect - a mark or flaw that spoils the appearance of something (especially on a person's body); "a facial blemish"
dig - a small gouge (as in the cover of a book); "the book was in good condition except for a dig in the back cover"
2.nick - (British slang) a prison; "he's in the nick"
prison, prison house - a correctional institution where persons are confined while on trial or for punishment
jargon, lingo, patois, argot, vernacular, slang, cant - a characteristic language of a particular group (as among thieves); "they don't speak our lingo"
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
3.nick - a small cut
cutting, cut - the act of penetrating or opening open with a sharp edge; "his cut in the lining revealed the hidden jewels"
Verb1.nick - cut slightly, with a razor; "The barber's knife nicked his cheek"
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
2.nick - cut a nick into
cut - separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope"
3.nick - divide or reset the tail muscles of; "nick horses"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
4.nick - mate successfully; of livestock
copulate, mate, couple, pair - engage in sexual intercourse; "Birds mate in the Spring"

nick

verb
1. (Slang) steal, pinch (informal), swipe (slang), pilfer, trouser (slang), knock off (slang), snitch (slang) We used to nick biscuits from the kitchen.
2. arrest, apprehend, take into custody, nail (informal), lift (slang), seize, run in (slang), bust (informal), collar (informal), pinch (informal), nab (informal), take prisoner, feel your collar (slang) The police nicked me for carrying an offensive weapon.
3. cut, mark, score, damage, chip, scratch, scar, notch, dent, snick A sharp blade is likely to nick the skin and draw blood.
noun
1. cut, mark, scratch, score, chip, scar, notch, dent, snick The barbed wire had left only the tiniest nick below my right eye.
2. (Brit. slang) prison, can (slang), jail, clink (slang), stir (slang), cooler (slang), jug (slang), penitentiary (U.S.), slammer (slang), lockup, penal institution, choky (slang), poky or pokey (U.S. & Canad. slang) He spent a few years in the nick for smuggling.

nick

verb
Slang. To exploit (another) by charging too much for something:
Idioms: make someone pay through the nose, take someone for a ride , take someone to the cleaners .
Translations
ثَلْم، حَزيَثْلم، يَحِز، يَجْرَح
zářezříznoutvrub
hakskære
naarmu
skeraskora
įkarpaįpjautiįraižaįrėžtipačiu laiku
iegriezumsierobījumsierobītiezīmējumsviegli iegriezt
çentikçentmekhafif kesikhafif kesmekkertik

Nick

[nɪk] N (familiar form) of Nicholas Old Nick (hum) → Pedro Botero (hum)

nick

[nɪk]
A. N
1. (= cut) → muesca f, mella f; (= crack) → hendedura f
2. (Brit) (= prison) → chirona f, trullo m (Sp) ; (= police station) → comisaría f
3. in the nick of timejusto a tiempo
4. (= condition) in good nicken buen estado
B. VT
1. (= cut) → hacer una muesca en, mellar
he nicked his chin shavingse hizo un corte en la barbilla afeitándose
the bullet had nicked the bonela bala le había hendido el hueso
the film does no more than nick the surface of this thorny issuela película no hace más que tocar muy de refilón este espinoso asunto
to nick o.scortarse
2. (= steal) → robar, afanar; (= arrest) → agarrar, trincar (Sp) , apañar (Mex)
you're nicked!¡estás detenido!

nick

[ˈnɪk]
n
(= cut) → coupure f
(British) in good nick (= good condition) [thing] → en bon état; [person] → en bonne condition physique
(= prison) the nick → le trou
in the nick of time → juste à temps
to arrive in the nick of time → arriver juste à temps
vt
(= cut) → couper
to nick one's chin → se couper le menton
He'd nicked his chin, shaving → Il s'était coupé le menton en se rasant.
to nick o.s. → se couper
(= steal) → piquer
He's nicked all your ideas → Il a piqué toutes tes idées.
Michelle had her purse nicked → Michelle s'est fait piquer son porte-monnaie.
(British) (= arrest) → pincer
to get nicked (by police)se faire pincer
to be nicked for sth → se faire pincer pour qch
The police nicked me for speeding → La police m'a pincé pour excès de vitesse.

Nick

n abbr of Nicholas; Old Nick (inf)der Böse, der Leibhaftige (old)

nick

1
n
Kerbe f; I got a little nick on my chinich habe mich leicht am Kinn geschnitten
in the nick of timegerade noch (rechtzeitig)
(Brit inf: = condition) in good/bad nickgut/nicht gut in Schuss (inf)
vt
wood, stickeinkerben; to nick oneself (inf)sich schneiden; to nick one’s chin (inf)sich am Kinn schneiden
(bullet) person, wall, armstreifen

nick

2 (Brit)
vt (inf)
(= arrest)einsperren (inf), → einlochen (inf); (= catch)schnappen (inf); he got nickedden haben sie sich (dat)gegriffen (sl)or geschnappt (inf); you’re nicked!Sie sind verhaftet!
(= steal)klauen (inf), → mitgehen lassen (inf)
n (inf) (= prison)Kittchen nt (inf), → Knast m (inf); (= police station)Wache f, → Revier nt

nick

3
vt (US sl) to nick somebody for somethingjdm etw abknöpfen (inf)

nick

[nɪk]
1. n
a. (in wood, blade) → tacca; (in skin) → taglietto; (in plate) → scheggiatura
in the nick of time → appena in tempo
b. (fam) in good nickdecente, in buono stato
c. (Brit) (fam) (prison) → galera; (police station) → centrale f (di polizia)
in the nick → in galera
2. vt
a. (see n) → intaccare; (XXX) → tagliare, scheggiare, scalfire
to nick o.s. → farsi un taglietto
b. (fam) (steal) → fregare
c. (Brit) (fam) (arrest) → beccare
to get nicked → farsi beccare

nick

(nik) noun
a small cut. There was a nick in the doorpost.
verb
to make a small cut in something. He nicked his chin while he was shaving.
in the nick of time
at the last possible moment; just in time. He arrived in the nick of time.

nick

n cortada pequeña, (during surgery) perforación f; vt cortar levemente, perforar (sin querer)
References in classic literature ?
Bhaer was Nick Bottom, and Tina was Titania, a perfect little fairy in his arms.
I mean that this Indian comes just in the nick of time.
Didn't I hear that Nick Svendsen was rushing you pretty hard?
Why, her face--I've seen it, for I dug her garden for her one year--her face is enough to frighten the Old Nick himself, if he had ever so great a mind to trade with her.
It came into my mind in the nick of time, how Columbus, or Cortez, or one of those people, played an eclipse as a saving trump once, on some savages, and I saw my chance.
She was horrified to think how near she had come to being guilty herself; she had been saved in the nick of time by a revival in the colored Methodist Church, a fortnight before, at which time and place she "got religion.
Hindley hurried up from his paradise on the hearth, and seizing one of us by the collar, and the other by the arm, hurled both into the back-kitchen; where, Joseph asseverated, "owd Nick would fetch us as sure as we were living: and, so comforted, we each sought a separate nook to await his advent.
The doctor came in the nick of time, and soon brought her to.
He felt that he was restored to consciousness in the right nick of time, for the especial purpose of holding a conference with the second messenger despatched to him through Jacob Marley's intervention.
So, the Spider, doggedly watching Estella, outwatched many brighter insects, and would often uncoil himself and drop at the right nick of time.
Rather, from the strange fact that the robber had left no traces, and had happened to know the nick of time, utterly incalculable by mortal agents, when Silas would go away from home without locking his door, the more probable conclusion seemed to be, that his disreputable intimacy in that quarter, if it ever existed, had been broken up, and that, in consequence, this ill turn had been done to Marner by somebody it was quite in vain to set the constable after.
Suffice it for all third persons to know--what Rosalind indeed has never known, and what I hope no reader will be fool enough to tell her--that Orlando was for the moment hopelessly and besottedly faithless to his wife, and that my services had been bespoken in the very narrowest nick of time.