nidus


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ni·dus

 (nī′dəs)
n. pl. ni·dus·es or ni·di (-dī)
1. A central point or focus of infection by bacteria or other pathogens.
2. A point or place at which something originates, accumulates, or develops, such as the center around which a calculus forms.

[Latin nīdus; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

nidus

(ˈnaɪdəs)
n, pl -di (-daɪ)
1. (Zoology) the nest in which insects or spiders deposit their eggs
2. (Pathology) pathol a focus of infection
3. (Botany) a cavity in which plant spores develop
[C18: from Latin nest]
ˈnidal adj

ni•dus

(ˈnaɪ dəs)

n., pl. -di (-dī).
1. a nest, esp. one in which insects, spiders, etc., deposit their eggs.
2. any focal point in the body where bacteria or other infectious organisms tend to thrive.
[1735–45; < Latin nīdus nest]
ni′dal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organismnidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organism; "the focus of infection"
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
focal infection - bacterial infection limited to a specific organ or region especially one causing symptoms elsewhere
2.nidus - a nest in which spiders or insects deposit their eggs
nest - a structure in which animals lay eggs or give birth to their young
wasp's nest, wasps' nest, hornet's nest, hornets' nest - habitation for wasps or hornets
Translations

ni·dus

n. nido.
References in classic literature ?
If this be hypocrisy, it is a process which shows itself occasionally in us all, to whatever confession we belong, and whether we believe in the future perfection of our race or in the nearest date fixed for the end of the world; whether we regard the earth as a putrefying nidus for a saved remnant, including ourselves, or have a passionate belief in the solidarity of mankind.
Certain seeds which are required to find a nidus for themselves under unfavorable circumstances have been supplied by nature with an apparatus of hooks, so that they will get a hold on very unreceptive surfaces.
The epithelial component can display a variety of atypia and may represent a nidus for development of ductal carcinoma in situ.
Effects of 6-benzylaminopurine on the organogenesis of Asplenium nidus L.
13-21) So as we view the myocarditis, arrhythmic, and other cardiovascular deaths in athletes, we have to ask, is it possible that the very activities which we love--our endurance sports--are acting as the nidus for LPS toxicity that is poisoning our hearts?
Physicians thinking differently can be the nidus for important changes.
Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography identified the mass as a cranio-orbital AVM with the nidus in the subcutaneous tissue of the left upper eyelid.
The name of the fossil is derived from the Latin Nidus, meaning 'bird's nest' or 'fancied resemblance to' and adelric, derived from the Old English personal name 'Aedelic' -- 'adel', meaning 'noble' and 'ric' meaning 'a ruler'- which is a source for the name Aldridge.
13] Further, urinary sodium excretion increases the saturation of monosodium urate, acting as a nidus for calcium crystallization.
The rate at which calcium apatite deposits form is currently unknown, but it is likely these deposits build up over months to years, and once they ultimately erode through the urothelium, serve as the nidus for stone formation within the urinary space (Evan et al.
She previously held various board roles at Mercy Health Plans, the Nidus Center for Scientific Enterprise and Indevus Pharmaceuticals.
Entertainment will be provided by a Welsh National Opera string ensemble, renowned Welsh folk group Mabon and the award-winning Gwent-based Nidus Children's choir.