nidus


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ni·dus

 (nī′dəs)
n. pl. ni·dus·es or ni·di (-dī)
1. A central point or focus of infection by bacteria or other pathogens.
2. A point or place at which something originates, accumulates, or develops, such as the center around which a calculus forms.

[Latin nīdus; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

nidus

(ˈnaɪdəs)
n, pl -di (-daɪ)
1. (Zoology) the nest in which insects or spiders deposit their eggs
2. (Pathology) pathol a focus of infection
3. (Botany) a cavity in which plant spores develop
[C18: from Latin nest]
ˈnidal adj

ni•dus

(ˈnaɪ dəs)

n., pl. -di (-dī).
1. a nest, esp. one in which insects, spiders, etc., deposit their eggs.
2. any focal point in the body where bacteria or other infectious organisms tend to thrive.
[1735–45; < Latin nīdus nest]
ni′dal, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organismnidus - a central point or locus of an infection in an organism; "the focus of infection"
point - the precise location of something; a spatially limited location; "she walked to a point where she could survey the whole street"
focal infection - bacterial infection limited to a specific organ or region especially one causing symptoms elsewhere
2.nidus - a nest in which spiders or insects deposit their eggs
nest - a structure in which animals lay eggs or give birth to their young
wasp's nest, wasps' nest, hornet's nest, hornets' nest - habitation for wasps or hornets
Translations

ni·dus

n. nido.
References in classic literature ?
Certain seeds which are required to find a nidus for themselves under unfavorable circumstances have been supplied by nature with an apparatus of hooks, so that they will get a hold on very unreceptive surfaces.
If this be hypocrisy, it is a process which shows itself occasionally in us all, to whatever confession we belong, and whether we believe in the future perfection of our race or in the nearest date fixed for the end of the world; whether we regard the earth as a putrefying nidus for a saved remnant, including ourselves, or have a passionate belief in the solidarity of mankind.
The nidus might be located in any part of the brain, for example, supratentorial, subtentorial, deep, or superficial.
Salivary stasis and ductal inflammation promote aggregation of mineralized debris to form nidus, which ultimately leads to the formation of calculi.
Their angioarchitecture is complex and includes arterial feeders, a net of dysplastic vessels, so-called nidus and draining veins (12).
Because of angiographic and anatomical features of the arteriovenous malformation (deep location and deep venous drainage, but also small arteriovenous malformation nidus size), radiosurgery was the preferred treatment modality.
They are high-flow malformations that are radiographically characterized by a central nidus, a tangle of blood vessels where the abnormal arterial-venous communication exists without a normal intervening capillary bed.
However, that antibiotic didn't treat Aeromonas bacteria harboring in my poor-healing nidus of an opening.
12] proposed a global and iterative local thresholding for the nidus and vessel segmentation in DSA images.
Treatment aims to eliminate the flow within that nidus.
4] This immunosuppression plays a nidus for new opportunistic infections or reactivation of latent infections.
In the small intestine, the most common location is the terminal ileum, where alkaline pH favors calcium salt precipitation over food particles which act as a nidus.