nightingale


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night·in·gale

 (nīt′n-gāl′, nī′tĭng-)
n.
1. A songbird (Luscinia megarhynchos) of Eurasia and Africa with reddish-brown plumage, noted for the melodious song of the male during the breeding season, most often heard at night.
2. Any of various other songbirds of the genus Luscinia.

[Middle English, from Old English nihtegale : niht, night; see night + galan, to sing; see ghel- in Indo-European roots.]

nightingale

(ˈnaɪtɪŋˌɡeɪl)
n
1. (Animals) a brownish European songbird, Luscinia megarhynchos, with a broad reddish-brown tail: well known for its musical song, usually heard at night
2. (Animals) any of various similar or related birds, such as Luscinia luscinia (thrush nightingale)
[Old English nihtegale, literally: night-singer, from night + galan to sing]

Nightingale

(ˈnaɪtɪŋˌɡeɪl)
n
(Biography) Florence, known as the Lady with the Lamp. 1820–1910, English nurse, famous for her work during the Crimean War. She helped to raise the status and quality of the nursing profession and founded a training school for nurses in London (1860)

night•in•gale

(ˈnaɪt nˌgeɪl, ˈnaɪ tɪŋ-)

n.
any of several small Old World birds of the thrush subfamily, esp. Luscinia megarhynchos, of Europe, noted for the melodious song of the male, often heard at night.
[1200–50; Middle English nightyngale, nightegale, Old English nihtegale, c. German Nachtigall, literally, night singer (compare Old English galan sing; akin to yell)]

Night•in•gale

(ˈnaɪt nˌgeɪl, ˈnaɪ tɪŋ-)

n.
Florence, 1820–1910, English nurse and hospital reformer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nightingale - European songbird noted for its melodious nocturnal songnightingale - European songbird noted for its melodious nocturnal song
thrush - songbirds characteristically having brownish upper plumage with a spotted breast
genus Luscinia, Luscinia - nightingales
bulbul - nightingale spoken of in Persian poetry
2.nightingale - English nurse remembered for her work during the Crimean War (1820-1910)Nightingale - English nurse remembered for her work during the Crimean War (1820-1910)

nightingale

noun
Related words
collective noun watch
Translations
بُلْبُل
славей
slavík
nattergal
etelänsatakieli
fülemülecsalogány
næturgali
luscinia
lakštingala
lakstīgala
privighetoare
slávik
slavec
соловей

nightingale

[ˈnaɪtɪŋgeɪl] Nruiseñor m

nightingale

[ˈnaɪtɪŋgeɪl] nrossignol m

nightingale

nNachtigall f

nightingale

[ˈnaɪtɪŋˌgeɪl] nusignolo

nightingale

(ˈnaitiŋgeil) , ((American) -tən-) noun
a type of small bird with a beautiful song.
References in classic literature ?
The day in Richmond Park was charming, for we had a regular English picnic, and I had more splendid oaks and groups of deer than I could copy, also heard a nightingale, and saw larks go up.
Either of these last two birds is superior to the nightingale or the lark, though, in general, the American birds are less musical than those of Europe.
It was a calm, sweet April night; there were no sounds but a few low notes of a nightingale, and nothing moved but the white clouds near the moon and a brown owl that flitted over the hedge.
I hear a nightingale warbling in a wood half a mile off; no moving form is visible, no coming step audible; but that perfume increases: I must flee.
Only when the lark shall mate with the nightingale, and the honey-bee and the clock-beetle keep house together, shall I wed another maid.
He went to the Gallapagos, a horrid dry place on the Equator, where he was nearly baked to death; he went to the Georgia Islands, the Orkneys, Emerald Island, Little Nightingale Island, Gough's Island, Bouvet's Island, the Crossets, and even to a little speck of an island south of the Cape of Good Hope.
And he had also a nightingale which could sing as if all the beautiful melodies in the world were shut up in its little throat.
The dogs all round the neighborhood were howling, and in our shrubbery, seemingly just outside, a nightingale was singing.
The man, hearing nothing more, stood erect, and while Monte Cristo was completing his disguise had advanced straight to the secretary, whose lock was beginning to crack under his nightingale.
As the dun nightingale, daughter of Pandareus, sings in the early spring from her seat in shadiest covert hid, and with many a plaintive trill pours out the tale how by mishap she killed her own child Itylus, son of king Zethus, even so does my mind toss and turn in its uncertainty whether I ought to stay with my son here, and safeguard my substance, my bondsmen, and the greatness of my house, out of regard to public opinion and the memory of my late husband, or whether it is not now time for me to go with the best of these suitors who are wooing me and making me such magnificent presents.
At last a nightingale, lost in a thicket of shrubs, in the midst of its most melodious cadences had fluted low and lower into stillness and fallen asleep.
Many a time, when we have had the benefit of a full moon, and when the night has been mild and balmy, when, moreover, a certain nightingale has been singing, and a certain stream, hid in alders, has lent the song a soft accompaniment, the remote church-bell of the one hamlet in a district of ten miles, has tolled midnight ere the lord of the wood left us at our porch.