nightscape


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night·scape

 (nīt′skāp′)
n.
1. A painting or other representation of a night scene.
2. A place or scene at night: "Some can remember the war only in flashes, like a nightscape lit by lightning" (Andrew Ward).
References in periodicals archive ?
Colin says: "Eerie image at Neston marshes and the warm glow of the city lights adds to this atmospheric nightscape.
Still another consideration is the subject--what makes for an outstanding nightscape image will be completely different than, say, what makes an outstanding planetary picture.
The 13 types of subjects and scenes currently identified include blue sky, flower, plant, beach, sunrise/sunset, performance, food, text, nightscape, snow, cat, dog, and portrait.
The camera is able to identify scenes and subjects, including blue sky, flowers, plant, beach, sunset/sunrise, performance, food, text, nightscape, snow, cat, dog and portrait.
One of Hadar Goldin's paintings is a beautiful nightscape, an early gift to the new girlfriend who eventually became his fiancee.
There are various times and menus to choose, starting with breakfast followed by wine-matched three course lunches; champagne high teas; American-style BBQ dishes; four-course dinners with wine then night sittings when guests can enjoy the sparkling Newcastle nightscape with cocktails in hand.
During video posted by Gallagher, who goes by the name of Nightscape, he is heard calling the stunt "crazy" and "madness".
Some of his nightscape work from the island was published worldwide and includes the front page of the 2016 novel The 100 Year Miracle.
Among the most important prints here is 'Moonglow,' an abstracted nightscape exhibited at Cleveland Art Museum in 1964 when its Print Club honored Sanso as Printmaker of the Year.
The rendition of motion upon the page remains a continued investment that resurfaces in later work such as the Mirror Image series (figures 2 and 3) and Nightscape n (2011).
Contract awarded for Cultural Bridge nightscape Improvement Project
For, as Birdman points out, popular culture, whatever its vagaries and vulgarities--in contrast to the grimly forbidding nightscape of the modernist art world--still welcomes the sight of heroes.