nihilism


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Related to nihilism: Moral nihilism

ni·hil·ism

 (nī′ə-lĭz′əm, nē′-)
n.
1. Philosophy The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
2. Relentless negativity or cynicism suggesting an absence of values or beliefs: nihilism in postwar art.
3.
a. Political belief or action that advocates or commits violence or terrorism without discernible constructive goals.
b. also Nihilism A diffuse, revolutionary movement of mid-19th-century Russia that scorned authority and tradition and believed in reason, materialism, and radical change in society and government through terrorism and assassination.
4. Psychiatry A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.

[Latin nihil, nothing; see ne in Indo-European roots + -ism.]

ni′hil·ist n.
ni′hil·is′tic adj.
ni′hil·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

nihilism

(ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzəm)
n
1. a complete denial of all established authority and institutions
2. (Philosophy) philosophy an extreme form of scepticism that systematically rejects all values, belief in existence, the possibility of communication, etc
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a revolutionary doctrine of destruction for its own sake
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the practice or promulgation of terrorism
[C19: from Latin nihil nothing + -ism, on the model of German Nihilismus]
ˈnihilist n, adj
ˌnihilˈistic adj

Nihilism

(ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzəm)
n
(Historical Terms) (in tsarist Russia) any of several revolutionary doctrines that upheld terrorism

ni•hil•ism

(ˈnaɪ əˌlɪz əm, ˈni-)

n.
1. total rejection of established laws and institutions.
2. anarchy, terrorism, or other revolutionary activity.
3.
a. the belief that all existence is senseless and that there is no possibility of an objective basis for truth.
b. nothingness or nonexistence.
4. (cap.) a 19th-century Russian political philosophy advocating the violent destruction of social and political institutions to make way for a new society.
[1810–20; < Latin nihil nothing (variant of nihilum; see nil) + -ism]
ni′hil•ist, n., adj.
ni`hil•is′tic, adj.

nihilism

the belief that existence is not real and that there can be no objective basis of truth, a form of extreme skepticism. Cf. ethical nihilism. — nihilist, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy
the principles of a Russian revolutionary movement in the late 19th century, advocating the destruction of government as a means to anarchy and of ten employing terrorism and assassination to assist its program. — nihilist, n., adj.nihilistic, adj.
See also: Government
total rejection of established attitudes, practices, and institutions. — nihilist, n.nihilistic, adj.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nihilism - a revolutionary doctrine that advocates destruction of the social system for its own sake
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.nihilism - the delusion that things (or everything, including the self) do not exist; a sense that everything is unreal
delusion, psychotic belief - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrary
3.nihilism - complete denial of all established authority and institutions
anarchy, lawlessness - a state of lawlessness and disorder (usually resulting from a failure of government)

nihilism

noun
1. negativity, rejection, denial, scepticism, cynicism, pessimism, renunciation, atheism, repudiation, agnosticism, unbelief, abnegation These disillusioned students embraced agnosticism, atheism, and nihilism.
2. anarchy, disorder, lawlessness This moral nihilism has proved both irresponsible and politically counter-productive.
Translations
nihilizmus
nihilismi
nihilizam

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪlɪzəm] Nnihilismo m

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪlɪzəm] nnihilisme m

nihilism

nNihilismus m

nihilism

[ˈnaɪɪˌlɪzm] nnichilismo

ni·hil·ism

n. nihilismo, en psiquiatría una idea ilusoria en la cual nada es real o inexistente.
References in classic literature ?
In the penultimate verse he makes known his discovery concerning the root of modern Nihilism and indifference,--i.
But there was also about him an indescribable air which no mechanic could have acquired in the practice of his handicraft however dishonestly exercised: the air common to men who live on the vices, the follies, or the baser fears of mankind; the air of moral nihilism common to keepers of gambling hells and disorderly houses; to private detectives and inquiry agents; to drink sellers and, I should say, to the sellers of invigorating electric belts and to the inventors of patent medicines.
Moral nihilism or the notion "that nothing is morally good, bad, wrong, right, etc " is another of countless issues.
In doing so, Rosen steers the Oakeshottian "conversation of mankind" away from the shores of nihilism to which it has devolved under the superbia of the voice of technology.
Philosophy in a Meaningless Life: A System of Nihilism, Consciousness and Reality
Nihilism is not confined to German and French thought.
The black-and-white polish of "Concrete Night" is as sleek and lovely as it was in "3 Rooms," but this mawkish bummer about an ill-used teenage boy wandering around a surreally forbidding Helsinki is marred by a facile nihilism that trivializes the urban alienation it seeks to illuminate.
PROVOCATIVE A frightening journey into nihilism in the Outback
From big brother to Big Brother; nihilism and literature in Britain, America, France and Australia in the age of screens.
Love of tradition is love of reality, of life, and of being, while faith in "progress" amounts to the pursuit of a mirage, leading sooner or later to despair and nihilism.
The concept of therapeutic nihilism and discreet euthanasia such as the controversial Liverpool pathways are causing much debate in the UK.
Bloom's warning about the pernicious influence of German nihilism, relativism, and historicism on American academic education took its cue from their critical analysis in the writings of his teacher Leo Strauss.