ninny


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nin·ny

 (nĭn′ē)
n. pl. nin·nies
A fool; a simpleton.

[Perhaps alteration of innocent.]

ninny

(ˈnɪnɪ)
n, pl -nies
a dull-witted person
[C16: perhaps from an innocent simpleton]
ˈninnyish adj

nin•ny

(ˈnɪn i)

n., pl. -nies.
a fool or simpleton.
[1585–95; perhaps generic use of pet form of Innocent proper name; see -y2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ninny - a stupid foolish person
simpleton, simple - a person lacking intelligence or common sense

ninny

noun
One deficient in judgment and good sense:
Informal: dope, gander, goose.
Translations

ninny

[ˈnɪnɪ] Nbobo/a m/f

ninny

n (inf)Dussel m (inf)

ninny

[ˈnɪnɪ] n (fam) → sciocco/a
References in classic literature ?
I was thinking of the younger son, whom I once classed as a ninny, but who came back so ill from Nigeria.
He relates that he met at Brussels Rochefort, the AME DAMNEE of the cardinal disguised as a Capuchin, and that this cursed Rochefort, thanks to his disguise, had tricked Monsieur de Laigues, like a ninny as he is.
The Colonel is a ninny, my dear; because he has two thousand a-year himself, he thinks that nobody else can marry on less.
And of course he's listening to her like a perfect ninny.
Don't quote that old ninny to me," cried Miss Cornelia.
And after brandy, taken in sufficient quantity, it says, "Now, come, fool, grin and tumble, that your fellow-men may laugh - drivel in folly, and splutter in senseless sounds, and show what a helpless ninny is poor man whose wit and will are drowned, like kittens, side by side, in half an inch of alcohol.
I ought to have gone without a word to the poor dear doting old creature, and taken her out of the hands of that ninny Briggs, and that harpy of a femme de chambre.
Miss Catherine, as the ninny calls her, will discover his value, and send him to the devil.
His only servant was a sort of Jocrisse, a lad of the neighborhood, rather a ninny, trained slowly and with difficulty to du Bousquier's requirements.
I mean, I restored him to the bosom of the club, and compassionating the feebleness of his health and extreme lowness of his spirits, I recommended him to "take a little wine for his stomach's sake," and, when he was sufficiently re-established, to embrace the media-via, ni-jamais-ni-toujours plan - not to kill himself like a fool, and not to abstain like a ninny - in a word, to enjoy himself like a rational creature, and do as I did; for, don't think, Helen, that I'm a tippler; I'm nothing at all of the kind, and never was, and never shall be.
Thus he sought pathetically enough to ingratiate himself with the young, and to prove to them beyond a doubt that though married to a ninny of a wife, and rather pale and bent and careworn by his weight of learning, he was as much alive as the youngest of them all.
In one, a duck wears a tux; in another, a nanny as thin as a pin drives a ninny and her mini granny to a local inn; and while Adam weeps as they're expelled from Eden, Eve, being shrewd, keeps the seeds in her cheeks.