niobium


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ni·o·bi·um

 (nī-ō′bē-əm)
n. Symbol Nb
A silvery, soft, rare, ductile metallic element that occurs chiefly in columbite-tantalite and is used in steel alloys, arc welding, and superconductive materials. Atomic number 41; atomic weight 92.906; melting point 2,477°C; boiling point 4,744°C; specific gravity 8.57; valence 2, 3, 5. See Periodic Table.

[After Niobe (so called because it is extracted from tantalite).]

niobium

(naɪˈəʊbɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a ductile white superconductive metallic element that occurs principally in columbite and tantalite: used in steel alloys. Symbol: Nb; atomic no: 41; atomic wt: 92.90638; valency: 2, 3, or 5; relative density: 8.57; melting pt: 2469±10°C; boiling pt: 4744°C. Former name: columbium
[C19: from New Latin, from Niobe (daughter of Tantalus), so named because it occurred in tantalite]

ni•o•bi•um

(naɪˈoʊ bi əm)

n.
a steel-gray metallic element resembling tantalum in its chemical properties; becomes a superconductor below 9 K; used chiefly in alloy steels. Symbol: Nb; at. no.: 41; at. wt.: 92.906; sp. gr.: 8.4 at 20°C.
[1835–45; < New Latin; see Niobe, -ium2]

ni·o·bi·um

(nī-ō′bē-əm)
Symbol Nb A soft, silvery, easily shaped metallic element that usually occurs in nature together with the element tantalum. It is used to build nuclear reactors, to make steel alloys, and to allow magnets to conduct electricity with almost no resistance. Atomic number 41. See Periodic Table.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.niobium - a soft grey ductile metallic element used in alloysniobium - a soft grey ductile metallic element used in alloys; occurs in niobite; formerly called columbium
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
columbium - a former name for niobium
columbite, niobite - a black mineral that is an ore of niobium and tantalum
Translations
ниобий
niob
niobium
nioobium
niobiniobium
niobij
nióbium
ニオブ
niobis
niob
niobiu
niobij
niob
niyobyum
niobi

niobium

[nɑɪˈəʊbɪəm] Nniobio m

niobium

n (Chem) → Niob nt
References in periodicals archive ?
The framework agreement with purchase orders defines the conditions according to which the cea entrusts to the holder, who accepts, the supply of high purity niobium (rrr 260) necessary for the manufacture of the series cavities.
has acquired all issued and outstanding shares of Anglo American Fosfatos Brasil Limitada and Anglo American Niobio Brasil Limitada, as well as the associated niobium sales and marketing function, effective 1 October 2016, the company said.
Technavio's analysts forecast the global niobium market to grow at a CAGR of 7.
A great variety of photometric reagents is known for the determination of niobium.
Niobium (Nb), which becomes superconductive at the highest temperature (9.
In this new work, he and his colleagues have shown that desirable characteristics for such devices, such as high power density, are not unique to carbon-based nanoparticles, and that niobium nanowire yarn is a promising an alternative.
The underground mine is North America's only source of pyrochlore, the primary niobium ore, and one of only three major producers of niobium in the world.
One such substance is the material used the new magnet HQ02a 6 a compound called niobium tin.
In Estonia plasmochemical production of niobium and tantalum is using an environmentally friendly technology.
CBMM produces 80% of the world supply of niobium, which is used to strengthen steel and is used in making cars and natural-gas pipelines.
Rocher Deboule Minerals Corporation (Rocher Deboule) (TSX VENTURE:RD)(PINK SHEETS:RDBHF), a diversified exploration and development company, is planning to drill its 1,605 hectare rare earth niobium property.
Abstract Niobium films were deposited on silicon carbide by chemical vapor deposition using niobium chloride and hydrogen at a temperature range of 900-1300[degrees] C.