nitchie

nitchie

(ˈnɪtʃɪ)
n
an offensive term for a North American Indian
References in periodicals archive ?
Stallknecht, Elizabeth Nitchie concurs on the point that the shooting of the albatross is the replacement of "feeling" by "reason" resulting in spiritual dreariness and dryness.
Kvibuia Gray and Margaret Algar were winners of the women's doubles, defeating Geraldine Dodds and Diane Nitchie.
Various fields in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah including Sulphur Creek, Fontenelle, Nitchie Gulch, Flat Rock and others.
The Mossgiel, Green Gully, Lake Nitchie and Cossack individuals from southern Australia all date to <6500 BP (Pardoe 1993), and each has been examined by various workers attempting to understand variation in Australian populations during the Pleistocene/Holocene (Macintosh 1963; 1976a, 1976b; Thorne 1977; Freedman and Lofgren 1979; Pardoe 1993).
Elizabeth Nitchie, for example, calls Castruccio "Mary's first Byron" (Elizabeth Nitchie, Mary Shelley: Author of Frankenstein [New Brunswick: Rutgers UP, 1953] 110), while Ernest Lovell, in "Byron and the Byronic Hero," also discusses this connection.
27) For other Horatian allusions to Thackeray, see Nitchie 1918.
These include: JAAMAA (Finland), ZAAZAA (Tunisia), BEEBEE (Australia), CEEPEE (Canada), GEEGEE, NEEJEE (= nitchie, a derogatory term for a N.
Critic George Nitchie typifies a large number of commentators when he called A Further Range "Frost's first bad book.
2 See also George Nitchie, Human Values in the Poetry of Robert Frost (Durham: Duke UP, 1960) 117; and John Napier, "A Momentary Stay Against Confusion," Virginia Quarterly Review 33 (1957): 385.
Censored" by Godwin, who was asked to secure a publisher for it but found its focus on father-daughter incest "disgusting,"(2) and then left behind by Mary Shelley herself as she turned from the political to the domestic novel in Lodore, it was first brought out by Elizabeth Nitchie in 1959, when it must have seemed no more than a psychobiographical curiosity.
Measurements from Kow Swamp 1, 5, 14, 17 and the early Holocene skeleton from Lake Nitchie provide a sample from known male individuals.
Certainly," Nitchie asserts with confidence, "Mary is Mathilda.