no longer


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long 1

 (lông, lŏng)
adj. long·er, long·est
1.
a. Extending or traveling a relatively great distance.
b. Having relatively great height; tall.
c. Having the greater length of two or the greatest length of several: the long edge of the door.
2. Of relatively great duration: a long time.
3. Of a specified linear extent or duration: a mile long; an hour long.
4. Made up of many members or items: a long shopping list.
5.
a. Extending beyond an average or standard: a long game.
b. Extending or landing beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: Her first serve was long.
6. Tediously protracted; lengthy: a long speech.
7. Concerned with distant issues; far-reaching: took a long view of the geopolitical issues.
8. Involving substantial chance; risky: long odds.
9. Having an abundance or excess of: "politicians whose résumés are long on competence" (Margaret Garrard Warner).
10. Having a holding of a commodity or security in expectation of a rise in price: long on soybeans.
11.
a. Linguistics Having a comparatively great duration. Used of a vowel or consonant.
b. Grammar Relating to or being the English speech sounds (ā, ē, ī, ō, o͞o) that are tense vowels or diphthongs.
12. Being of relatively great duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
adv. longer, longest
1. During or for an extended period of time: The promotion was long due.
2. At or to a considerable distance; far: She walked long past the end of the trail.
3. Beyond a given boundary, limit, or goal: hit the return long.
4. For or throughout a specified period: They talked all night long.
5. At a point of time distant from that referred to: That event took place long before we were born.
6. Into or in a long position, as of a commodity market.
n.
1. A long time: This won't take long.
2. Linguistics A long syllable, vowel, or consonant.
3. One who acquires holdings in a security or commodity in expectation of a rise in price.
4.
a. A garment size for a tall person.
b. longs Trousers extending to the feet or ankles.
Idioms:
any longer
For more time: can't wait any longer.
before long
Soon.
long ago
1. At a time or during a period well before the present: I read that book long ago.
2. A time well before the present: heroes of long ago.
long in the tooth
Growing old.
no longer
Not now as formerly: He no longer smokes.
not long for
Unlikely to remain for much more time in: not long for this world.
the long and the short of it
The substance or gist: You can look on the front page of the paper for the long and the short of it.

[Middle English, from Old English lang; see del- in Indo-European roots.]

long 2

 (lông, lŏng)
intr.v. longed, long·ing, longs
To have an earnest, heartfelt desire, especially for something beyond reach.

[Middle English longen, from Old English langian; see del- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.no longer - not now; "she is no more"
still - with reference to action or condition; without change, interruption, or cessation; "it's still warm outside"; "will you still love me when we're old and grey?"
Translations
لم يَعُد
už ne
ikke længereikke mere
tovább nem
ekki lengur
už nie
artık-değil

long1

(loŋ) adjective
1. measuring a great distance from one end to the other. a long journey; a long road; long legs.
2. having a great period of time from the first moment to the last. The book took a long time to read; a long conversation; a long delay.
3. measuring a certain amount in distance or time. The wire is two centimetres long; The television programme was just over an hour long.
4. away, doing or using something etc for a great period of time. Will you be long?
5. reaching to a great distance in space or time. She has a long memory
adverb
1. a great period of time. This happened long before you were born.
2. for a great period of time. Have you been waiting long?
ˈlongways adverb
in the direction of the length. The planks had to go into the lorry longways.
ˌlong-ˈdistance adjective
long-distance races; a long-distance lorry-driver; a long-distance telephone call.
ˌlong-drawn-ˈout adjective
taking a needlessly long time. long-drawn-out discussions.
ˈlonghand noun
ordinary writing as opposed to shorthand.
long house
in tribal societies, a long rectangular dwelling shared by several families, especially in south-east Asia and amongst North American Indians.
long jump
a sports contest in which people jump as far as possible.
long-playing record (usually abbreviated to LP)
a record which plays for a long time.
ˌlong-ˈrange adjective
1. able to reach a great distance. long-range rockets.
2. taking into consideration a long period of time. a long-range weather forecast.
ˌlong-ˈsighted adjective
having difficulty in seeing close objects clearly.
ˌlong-ˈsightedness noun
ˌlong-ˈsuffering adjective
patiently enduring a great deal of trouble.
ˌlong-ˈwinded adjective
(of a speaker or his speech) tiresomely long.
as long as / so long as
1. provided only that. As/So long as you're happy, it doesn't matter what you do.
2. while; during the time that. As long as he's here I'll have more work to do.
before (very) long
soon. Come in and wait – he'll be here before long!
in the long run
in the end. We thought we would save money, but in the long run our spending was about the same as usual.
the long and the short of it
the whole story in a few words.
no longer
not now as in the past. This cinema is no longer used.
so long!
goodbye!.
References in classic literature ?
Back in his house at Blois, no longer having even Grimaud to receive a poor smile as he passed through the parterre, Athos daily felt the decline of vigor of a nature which for so long a time had seemed impregnable.
At length she could control herself no longer, so she sent a trusty servant to her old and faithful friend the Fairy of the Mountain, to beg her to devise some means by which she might get rid of her stepson.
The old-fashioned ship-life had returned, now that we were no longer in sight of land.
And the Annos descended on Nalasu's clearing, a dozen of them, armed with Sniders, horse pistols, tomahawks and war clubs, walking gingerly, despite their thick sandals, because of fear of the thorns which Nalasu no longer planted.
MY DEAR BROTHER,--I can no longer refuse myself the pleasure of profiting by your kind invitation when we last parted of spending some weeks with you at Churchhill, and, therefore, if quite convenient to you and Mrs.
But one has only to observe that hive to realize that there is no longer any life in it.
Here he no longer heard the horse's movements or the whistling of the wind, but only Nikita's breathing.
There came a time when not only did the meat-supply cease, but the milk no longer came from his mother's breast.
Let us behold, in poor Hepzibah, the immemorial, lady--two hundred years old, on this side of the water, and thrice as many on the other, --with her antique portraits, pedigrees, coats of arms, records and traditions, and her claim, as joint heiress, to that princely territory at the eastward, no longer a wilderness, but a populous fertility,--born, too, in Pyncheon Street, under the Pyncheon Elm, and in the Pyncheon House, where she has spent all her days, --reduced.
When he could hear it no longer, Bassett glanced at his watch.
They were no longer all of war, of revenge; they told of love also.
Thou goest the way to thy greatness: it must now be thy best courage that there is no longer any path behind thee!