no-go


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Related to no-go: go through, in favor of, swaying, foisted

no-go

(nō′gō′)
adj.
Not in a suitable condition for proceeding or functioning properly: The space launch was no-go.
n. pl. no-goes
A situation in which planned operations cannot be effectuated, as in the case of the launch of spacecraft: The flight is a no-go because of technical problems.

no-go

adj
something which is not working properly or which cannot go ahead

no′-go′



adj.
1. not functioning properly; not ready to proceed.
2. denying permission to proceed: a go or no-go decision.
[1865–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.no-go - not functioning properly or in suitable condition for proceeding; "the space launch was no-go"
go - functioning correctly and ready for action; "all systems are go"
Translations

no-go

[ˌnəʊˈgəʊ] ADJ no-go area (Brit) → zona f prohibida

go

(gəu) 3rd person singular present tense goes: past tense went (went) : past participle gone (gon) verb
1. to walk, travel, move etc. He is going across the field; Go straight ahead; When did he go out?
2. to be sent, passed on etc. Complaints have to go through the proper channels.
3. to be given, sold etc. The prize goes to John Smith; The table went for $100.
4. to lead to. Where does this road go?
5. to visit, to attend. He goes to school every day; I decided not to go to the movie.
6. to be destroyed etc. This wall will have to go.
7. to proceed, be done. The meeting went very well.
8. to move away. I think it is time you were going.
9. to disappear. My purse has gone!
10. to do (some action or activity). I'm going for a walk; I'm going hiking next week-end.
11. to fail etc. I think the clutch on this car has gone.
12. to be working etc. I don't think that clock is going.
13. to become. These apples have gone bad.
14. to be. Many people in the world regularly go hungry.
15. to be put. Spoons go in that drawer.
16. to pass. Time goes quickly when you are enjoying yourself.
17. to be used. All her pocket-money goes on sweets.
18. to be acceptable etc. Anything goes in this office.
19. to make a particular noise. Dogs go woof, not miaow.
20. to have a particular tune etc. How does that song go?
21. to become successful etc. She always makes a party go.
nounplural goes
1. an attempt. I'm not sure how to do it, but I'll have a go.
2. energy. She's full of go.
ˈgoing noun
1. an act of leaving, moving away etc. the comings and goings of the people in the street.
2. the conditions under which something is done. Walking was heavy going because of all the mud.
adjective
1. successful. That shop is still a going concern.
2. in existence at present. the going rate for typing manuscripts.
ˈgo-ahead adjective
successful and progressive. His firm is very go-ahead.
noun
permission. We'll start as soon as we get the go-ahead.
ˌgo-ˈgetter noun
a person with a great deal of energy, ability etc who gets what he wants.
ˌgoing-ˈover noun
a study or examination. He gave the accounts a thorough going-over.
ˌgoings-ˈon noun plural
(usually strange) happenings or behaviour.
ˌno-ˈgo adjective
(of a district etc) which a person etc is not allowed to enter. a no-go area.
all go adjective
very busy. It's all go in this office today.
be going on (for)
to be near or close to (a time, age etc). He must be going on (for) eighty.
be going strong
to be successful, healthy etc. Our business/grandfather is still going strong.
from the word go
from the very beginning.
get going
to get started. If you want to finish that job you'd better get going.
give the go-by
to ignore in an unfriendly way. I think we'll give all his stupid suggestions the go-by.
go about
1. to (begin to) work at. I don't know the best way to go about the job!
2. (of a ship) to change direction or turn around.
go after
1. to try to win. He's going after that prize.
2. to follow or chase. Go after him and apologize.
go against
1. to oppose or refuse to act on. A child should never go against his parents' wishes.
2. to be unacceptable to. This goes against my conscience.
go along
1. to go. I think I'll go along to that meeting.
2. to proceed or progress. Check your work as you go along.
go along with
to agree with. I'm afraid I can't go along with you on that.
go around
(of stories, rumours etc) to be passed from one person to another. There's a rumour going around that you are leaving.
go around with
to be friendly with. I don't like the group of friends you're going around with.
go at
1. to attack. The little boys went at each other with their fists.
2. to do with enthusiasm. He really went at the job of painting the wall.
go back
to return to an earlier time, topic of conversation etc. Let's go back for a minute to what we were talking about earlier.
go back on
to fail to do (something one has promised to do). I never go back on my promises.
go by
1. to base an opinion on. We can't go by what he says.
2. to be guided by. I always go by the instructions.
go down
1. (with well/badly) to be approved or disapproved of. The story went down well (with them).
2. (of a ship) to sink. They were lost at sea when the ship went down.
3. (of the sun or moon) to go below the horizon.
4. to be remembered. Your bravery will go down in history.
5. (of places) to become less desirable. This part of town has gone down in the last twenty years.
go far
to be successful. If you keep on working as hard as this, I'm sure you'll go far.
go for
to attack physically or in words. The two dogs went for each other as soon as they met.
go in
(of the sun or moon) to become covered by cloud.
go in for
1. to take part in. I'm not going in for the 1,000 metres race.
2. to do (something) as a hobby, career etc. My son is going in for medicine; She goes in for collecting postcards.
go into
1. to make a careful study of (something). We'll need to go into this plan in detail.
2. to discuss in detail. I don't want to go into the problems at the moment.
go off
1. (of a bomb etc) to explode. The little boy was injured when the firework went off in his hand.
2. (of an alarm) to ring. When the alarm went off the thieves ran away.
3. to leave. He went off yesterday.
4. to begin to dislike. I've gone off cigarettes.
5. to become rotten. That meat has gone off.
6. to stop working. The fan has gone off.
go on
1. to continue. Go on reading – I won't disturb you.
2. to talk a great deal, usually too much. She goes on and on about her health.
3. to happen. What is going on here?
4. to base one's investigations etc on. The police had very few clues to go on in their search for the murderer.
go on at
to nag at. Her mother went on at her for coming home late after the dance.
go out
1. to become extinguished. The light has gone out.
2. to go to parties, concerts, meetings etc. We don't go out as much as we did when we were younger.
3. to be frequently in the company of (a person, usually of the opposite sex). I've been going out with her for months.
go over
1. to study or examine carefully. I want to go over the work you have done before you do any more.
2. to repeat (a story etc). I'll go over the whole lesson again.
3. to list. He went over all her faults.
4. (of plays, behaviour etc) to be received (well or badly). The play didn't go over at all well the first night.
go round
to be enough for everyone. Is there enough food to go round?
go slow
(of workers in a factory etc) to work less quickly than usual, eg as a form of protest.
go steady
to have a close friendly relationship with someone of the opposite sex. My girl-friend and I have been going steady for a year.
go through
1. to search in. I've gone through all my pockets but I still can't find my key.
2. to suffer. You have no idea what I went through to get this finished in time.
3. to use up. We went through a lot of money on holiday.
4. to complete. to go through certain formalities.
5. to be completed. After long hours of negotiations, the deal went through.
go through with
to finish doing. I will go through with this in spite of what you say.
go too far
to do something which is so bad as to be unacceptable.
go towards
to help to buy etc. The money we collect will go towards a new roof.
go up
1. to increase in size, value etc. The temperature/price has gone up.
2. to be built. There are office blocks going up all over town.
go up in smoke/flames
to catch fire; to be destroyed or damaged by fire etc. The building across the street went up in flames.
go with
1. to be sold with, be part of etc. The carpets will go with the house.
2. to look etc well with. The carpet goes with the wallpaper.
go without
to manage without. If you can't afford a new dress, you'll have to go without (one).
keep going
to continue doing what one is doing; to survive. The snow was falling heavily, but we had to keep going; Business is bad at the moment, but we'll manage to keep going.
make a go (of something)
to make a success (of something). He has never owned a shop before, but I think he'll make a go of it.
on the go
very busy or active. He's always on the go, from morning to night.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lothians had 470 no-go addresses in 2015 and just 86 in 2012.
Yardley is in danger of becoming a no-go area for anyone not in a car," said Mr Ainsworth.
In the afternoon, he will exchange opinions with livestock farmers in the village of Iitate, which is located outside the no-go zone but has been ordered by the government to evacuate all residents by late May.
However, if they are run-down, parks can blight communities, become no-go areas and mean communities are deprived of the space they need.
Reader Ruth King, from Minny Street, Cathays, in Cardiff, said the city centre had become a no-go area after 6pm.
Fears of another summer of violence grew last month when a man struck four times in 90 minutes, again in the no-go areas named.
He said there is a possibility of residents of the five municipalities receiving a dose of 20 millisieverts during the course of a year, even if they live outside the no-go zone.
Fears that no-go areas for Christians were emerging in British towns and cities were expressed recently by the Bishop of Rochester.
SEFTON n 32 ASBOs obtained and the area's first no-go zone set up n Cross-border sweeps run with Lancashire police to target offenders journeying across the area to steal cars and raid homes
Lucy Kay, the Countryside Council for Wales Marine Conservation Officer for North West Wales, said: ``The European status of the site will protect wildlife, but it will not create a no-go area.
Last week, Oldham hit the headlines after Asian youths told a BBC investigations team that they were creating no-go zones for white people because police were not responding to attacks on their communities.
Glyn Travis, assistant general secretary of the Prison Officers' Association, claimed: "We have no-go areas in certain prisons because prisoners have got complete control.