nominal


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Related to nominal: Nominal scale, Nominal data

nom·i·nal

 (nŏm′ə-nəl)
adj.
1.
a. Of, resembling, relating to, or consisting of a name or names.
b. Assigned to or bearing a person's name: nominal shares.
2.
a. Existing in name only; not real: "a person with a nominal religious position but no actual duties" (Leo Damrosch).
b. Insignificantly small; trifling: a nominal sum.
3. Philosophy Of or relating to nominalism.
4. Economics Of or relating to an amount or rate that is not adjusted for inflation.
5. Business Of or relating to the par value of a security rather than the market value.
6. Grammar Of or relating to a noun or word group that functions as a noun.
n. Grammar
A word or group of words functioning as a noun.

[Middle English nominalle, of nouns, from Latin nōminālis, of names, from nōmen, nōmin-, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots.]

nom′i·nal·ly adv.

nominal

(ˈnɒmɪnəl)
adj
1. in name only; theoretical: the nominal leader.
2. minimal in comparison with real worth or what is expected; token: a nominal fee.
3. of, relating to, constituting, bearing, or giving a name
4. (Grammar) grammar of or relating to a noun or noun phrase
n
5. (Grammar) grammar a nominal element; a noun, noun phrase, or syntactically similar structure
6. (Music, other) bell-ringing the harmonic an octave above the strike tone of a bell
[C15: from Latin nōminālis of a name, from nōmen name]
ˈnominally adv

nom•i•nal

(ˈnɒm ə nl)

adj.
1. being such in name only; so-called; putative: the nominal head of the country.
2. (of a price, fee, etc.) named as a matter of form, being trifling in comparison with the actual value: a nominal price.
3. of, pertaining to, or constituting a name or names.
4. of, pertaining to, functioning as, or producing a noun: a nominal suffix.
5. containing, bearing, or giving a name or names.
6. Aerospace. performing or achieved within expected limits; normal and satisfactory.
n.
7. a word or group of words functioning as a noun.
[1425–75; late Middle English nominalle of a noun < Latin nōminālis]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nominal - a phrase that can function as the subject or object of a verb
phrase - an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
Adj.1.nominal - relating to or constituting or bearing or giving a name; "the Russian system of nominal brevity"; "a nominal lists of priests"; "taxable males as revealed by the nominal rolls"
2.nominal - insignificantly small; a matter of form only (`tokenish' is informal); "the fee was nominal"; "a token gesture of resistance"; "a toknenish gesture"
minimal, minimum - the least possible; "needed to enforce minimal standards"; "her grades were minimal"; "minimum wage"; "a minimal charge for the service"
3.nominal - pertaining to a noun or to a word group that functions as a noun; "nominal phrase"; "noun phrase"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
4.nominal - of, relating to, or characteristic of an amount that is not adjusted for inflation; "the nominal GDP"; "nominal interest rates"
economic science, economics, political economy - the branch of social science that deals with the production and distribution and consumption of goods and services and their management
real - of, relating to, or representing an amount that is corrected for inflation; "real prices"; "real income"; "real wages"
5.nominal - named; bearing the name of a specific person; "nominative shares of stock"
specified - clearly and explicitly stated; "meals are at specified times"
6.nominal - existing in name only; "the nominal (or titular) head of his party"
formal - being in accord with established forms and conventions and requirements (as e.g. of formal dress); "pay one's formal respects"; "formal dress"; "a formal ball"; "the requirement was only formal and often ignored"; "a formal education"

nominal

adjective
1. titular, formal, purported, in name only, supposed, so-called, pretended, theoretical, professed, ostensible As he was still not allowed to run a company, his wife became its nominal head.
2. token, small, symbolic, minimal, trivial, trifling, insignificant, inconsiderable The ferries carry bicycles for a nominal charge.
Translations
إسْمي، بالأسْم، رَمْزيصَغير أو قَليل جِدّاً
jmenovitýnepatrnýnominálnípodle jména
ubetydelig
névleges
sem er aî nafninu tilsem er til málamynda
formalusnominalus
formālsnomināls, simbolisks
nominal
podľa mena
ad olarakçok küçükismi var cismi yoksemboliksözde

nominal

[ˈnɒmɪnl]
A. ADJ (= in name) [Christian, Catholic] → solamente de nombre, nominal; (= token) [sum, charge] → simbólico
B. CPD nominal partner Nsocio/a m/f nominal
nominal value Nvalor m nominal
nominal wage Nsalario m nominal

nominal

[ˈnɒmɪnəl] adj
[charge, rent, fee] → symbolique
(ECONOMY) [value] → nominal(e); [rate] → nominal(e)
(= in name only) [leader, head] → nominal(e); [Christian] → non pratiquant(e)

nominal

adj
(= in name)nominell; nominal sharesStamm- or Gründungsaktien pl
(= small) salary, fee, amount, rentnominell, symbolisch
(Gram) → Nominal-; nominal clauseNominalphrase f

nominal

[ˈnɒmɪnl] adj (Gram, Econ) → nominale; (ostensible) → nominale, di nome

nominal

(ˈnəminəl) adjective
1. in name only, not in reality. He is only the nominal head of the firm.
2. very small. He had to pay only a nominal fine.

nom·i·nal

a. nominal;
___ aphasiaafasia ___.
References in classic literature ?
Swift was now rather old and feeble, taking only a nominal part in the activities of the firm made up of himself and his son.
He says that there can be no high civilization without enslavement of the masses, either nominal or real.
Even before Miss Taylor had ceased to hold the nominal office of governess, the mildness of her temper had hardly allowed her to impose any restraint; and the shadow of authority being now long passed away, they had been living together as friend and friend very mutually attached, and Emma doing just what she liked; highly esteeming Miss Taylor's judgment, but directed chiefly by her own.
But instead of having any thing to do, instead of having any profession chosen for me, or being allowed to chuse any myself, I returned home to be completely idle; and for the first twelvemonth afterwards I had not even the nominal employment, which belonging to the university would have given me; for I was not entered at Oxford till I was nineteen.
Having further accustomed themselves to the breaking of furniture and the staining of walls -- to thumping, tumbling, hammering, and screaming; to doors always banging, and to footsteps perpetually running up and down stairs -- the nominal master and mistress of the house fondly believed that their chief troubles were over.
It was no nominal meal that we were going to make, but a vigorous reality.
The Lacedaemonians, to gratify their allies, and yet preserve the semblance of an adherence to their ancient institutions, had recourse to the flimsy subterfuge of investing Lysander with the real power of admiral, under the nominal title of vice-admiral.
They must have reflected, that in all great changes of established governments, forms ought to give way to substance; that a rigid adherence in such cases to the former, would render nominal and nugatory the transcendent and precious right of the people to "abolish or alter their governments as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness,"[2] since it is impossible for the people spontaneously and universally to move in concert towards their object; and it is therefore essential that such changes be instituted by some INFORMAL AND UNAUTHORIZED PROPOSITIONS, made by some patriotic and respectable citizen or number of citizens.
Till these evil times, however, such allegiance had been merely nominal, and the colonists had ruled themselves, enjoying far more freedom than is even yet the privilege of the native subjects of Great Britain.
De la garde nationale Americaine = of the American national guard-- Cooper is here satirizing the pretensions and gaudy uniforms of civilians holding nominal commissions as "Colonels" of American state militias}
Among the islands of Polynesia, no sooner are the images overturned, the temples demolished, and the idolators converted into NOMINAL Christians, that disease, vice, and premature death make their appearance.
Even your constant little heart need not take fright at such a nominal change.