nominalism


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Related to nominalism: conceptualism

nom·i·nal·ism

 (nŏm′ə-nə-lĭz′əm)
n. Philosophy
The doctrine holding that abstract concepts, general terms, or universals have no independent existence but exist only as names.

nom′i·nal·ist n.
nom′i·nal·is′tic adj.

nominalism

(ˈnɒmɪnəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) the philosophical theory that the variety of objects to which a single general word, such as dog, applies have nothing in common but the name. Compare conceptualism, realism
ˈnominalist n, adj
ˌnominalˈistic adj

nom•i•nal•ism

(ˈnɒm ə nlˌɪz əm)

n.
the philosophical doctrine that general or abstract words do not stand for objectively existing entities and that universals are no more than names assigned to them. Compare conceptualism (def. 1), realism (def. 5a).
[1830–40; < French nominalisme. See nominal]
nom′i•nal•ist, n.
nom`i•nal•is′tic, adj.

nominalism

Medieval Philosophy. the doctrine that abstract words or universals do not represent objectively existing entities, and that universals are only names applied to individual physical particulars that alone exist objectively. — nominalist, n., adj.nominalistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

nominalism

The view that universals such as “the true” exist in name only and do not actually exist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nominalism - (philosophy) the doctrine that the various objects labeled by the same term have nothing in common but their name
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
Translations
nominalismus

nominalism

[ˈnɒmɪnəlɪzəm] Nnominalismo m

nominalism

n (Philos) → Nominalismus m
References in periodicals archive ?
All things monetary now seem wholly arbitrary; perhaps something as deep as nominalism is to blame.
Izquierdo's approach may be seen as a search for the third way between the (moderate) realism of the Thomists and the Scotists and the (conceptualist) nominalism of some Jesuits such as Pedro Hurtado de Mendoza (1578-1641).
Wilfrid Sellars, Idealism, and Realism: Understanding Psychological Nominalism
Early scholars had fixated on the place of Duns Scotus and William of Ockham, with their doctrines of voluntarism and radicalized nominalism (in the latter's case), as the roots of subjective theories of rights.
Eltschinger sees these critiques as rooted in the basic Buddhist tendency toward nominalism, with its "condemnation of hypostases and reifications" and its tendency to view classes of all kinds, including social denominations, as "mere designations," as "nothing but conventions" (pp.
I also found Popkin's hesitation between nominalism (which she ultimately adopts) and realism to be a way of placing her essay firmly in the twenty-first century.
While medieval scholastic philosophy considered nature to be a series of instantiations of what might be described as thoughts in the mind of a rational god, nominalism, which emerged in the 13th and 14th centuries, challenged this conception and was critical of its Aristotelian underpinnings, and eventually came to supersede it.
That is pure nominalism where words mean nothing to these justices and they can overcome the Constitution itself by further case law so that they can declare the Constitution unconstitutional.
In The Theological Origins of Modernity, Gillespie explains in detail how the effects of philosophical nominalism played out again and again over six centuries in failed attempts at intellectual syntheses from thinkers ranging from William of Ockham and Martin Luther to Descartes, Hegel, and Kant.
Nominalism is a view about the kinds of things there are in general.
Eagleton simplifies the debate into a question of realism versus nominalism.
Occam's philosophy is called nominalism or sometimes terminism because it sought the simplest explanations that could account for phenomena.