noncelebrity

noncelebrity

(ˌnɒnsɪˈlɛbrɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a person who is not a celebrity
References in periodicals archive ?
Typically, people rarely know the identity of a noncelebrity endorser, but this was not the case for the advertisements in this study.
There will be plenty of noncelebrity challenges for Feresten as well, including a couple looking to live off the grid for a year, an art director who wants a motorcycle with a sidecar for his bulldog and a retired NFL player who wants a classy ride on a budget.
Approving fan Paul Glover tweeted: "A nice normal noncelebrity name.
So quite why Celebs On Benefits resorted to featuring a noncelebrity unemployed teacher and a deluded little wannabe actor remains a mystery.
a noncelebrity) without any partisan leanings, than by a singer; however, Democrats' responses to the noncelebrity versus celebrity were the same.
In the noncelebrity category, the most eyepopping of these latelife weddings is of two former nuns, 55yearold former member of the Carmelite Sisters of Charity, Filipino Erlinda Perlado, to 70yearold former member of a US Catholic religious congregation, American Joan Martens.
The night's only noncelebrity reader, Michaela Coplen, was a student poet who recited her own "Redeployment.
I can't name a noncelebrity who has been imitated by more people.
A noncelebrity, nonpower journalist can actually have much influence.
Stephen and Oliver Toubia monitored the twitter activity of 100 twitter accounts made by their research assistants, who followed 2,500 Twitter users who were noncorporate and noncelebrity.
The biggest problem with laws meant to rein in paparazzi is that they impose restrictions that can also be used to silence noncelebrity reporters following "hard" news.
One has to wonder how Tony Danza's experience would have differed had he been a noncelebrity without a reality TV contract, coming to teaching as a second profession, with a commitment to being a "real" teacher.