nonconceptual

nonconceptual

(ˌnɒnkənˈsɛptʃʊəl)
adj
not conceptual or related to mental concepts
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike, for example, neo-Aristotelian theories that are grounded upon the contested concept eudaimonia, a nonconceptual foundation that begins with exemplars identified by the emotion of admiration need not be able to provide a conceptual account of what makes an exemplar an exemplar.
Gunther, Essays on Nonconceptual Content (Cambridge, MA: Bradford Books, 2003).
The dialectic of the concept 'says no more' than this, 'that objects do not go into their concepts without leaving a remainder;' (63) whether it is the 'more' in the thing or the concept, it is Adorno's rejoinder to critically engage this remainder, to investigate non-reductively the difference excluded from the identifying process--what resists identification and is cast-off as surplus, contradictory and nonconceptual.
Instead of reading this scene as presenting the Adornian nonconceptual, as Abel does ("Imaging Germany" 27374), as unmediated a-representational presence, I argue that this is one more instance of the film's attempt to present picturing as an ethical problem.
Dunne (2011) argued that this kind of monitoring process still involves cognitive effort and thus falls short of the ultimate goal of nondual Mahamudra practice, namely, the natural and nonconceptual state of the mind.
Of course, Giles cannot abide the monstrosity of the nonconceptual,
Yogacara on the other hand, situates the nonconceptual state of meditative equipoise within an overarching structure of a system that distinguishes the conceptual and the nonconceptual.
KEY WORDS: intellectualism, reasons for action, nonconceptual content, phenomenology, absorbed coping
However, this would still be philosophically significant as a claim of nonconceptual metaphysical necessity.
Although the body is nonconceptual, it actually knows a great deal more than our conceptual minds do.
In order to pursue this line of thought, I draw on Zerilli's reading of Arendt and Kant in which she argues for the significance of judgment--a nonconceptual practice--as central to both aesthetics and politics.
In "Birch Bark," Annick Hillger sees "the silent waters of nonconceptual knowledge" (2006,16).