noncustodial

non·cus·to·di·al

 (nŏn′kŭ-stō′dē-əl)
adj.
1. Not having custody of one's children after a divorce or separation: a noncustodial parent.
2. Of or relating to a lack of child custody: noncustodial households.

noncustodial

(ˌnɒnkʌˈstəʊdɪəl)
adj
1. (Law) not having custody of a child
2. (Law) not involving a prison term
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References in periodicals archive ?
Bartelt presents two issues: first, whether Bartelt's confession to a serious crime transformed his custody status from noncustodial to "in custody;" and second, whether Bartelt's request for counsel was unequivocal such that police officers violated his Fifth Amendment rights when they questioned him the following day without counsel present.
The purpose was to get money back from noncustodial parents, typically dads, to reimburse the state.
A 1 1/2 -year-old Eugene boy taken from his home by a noncustodial parent last week has been found unharmed in Montana, and that parent was arrested on a theft charge.
With virtually no income, inmates who owe child support often leave prison with overwhelming debt--between $10,000 and $110,000 for each of them, according to a Marshall Project study of noncustodial parents in 10 states.
Organizations that do not represent noncustodial parents
wales Judge Huw Rees agreed to put back the sentencing for the reports to be put before him, but warned that he could not promise a noncustodial sentence.
While the terms two-generation or multi-generation approach are commonly used, APHSA's Center for Employment and Economic Well-Being prefers the whole-family label to accurately describe the most productive approach to human services and workforce engagement; this term is more inclusive and considers the extended family context, including challenges and resources of family members outside of the assistance unit, including nonresident or noncustodial parents, adult siblings, extended family members, and kin.
After a handful of noncustodial sentences, he was finally jailed at Cardiff Crown Court in May last year.
Throughout their childhood, next-door neighbors Emmy and Oliver were inseparable--until Oliver disappeared in second grade, kidnapped by his noncustodial father.
Massachusetts requires the consent of both legal parents, including the noncustodial parent, for a parent to relocate with the child, "unless the court upon cause shown otherwise orders.
Justifications for expanding the childless worker credit often focus on the employment problems of young people, less-educated minority men, and noncustodial fathers.