nondemocratic

nondemocratic

(ˌnɒndɛməˈkrætɪk)
adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) not adhering to the principles or practice of democracy
References in periodicals archive ?
The results show that growth in government size has negative effects on economic growth, but the negative effects are three times as great in nondemocratic socialist systems as in democratic market systems.
The other sector, led by former Chacao mayor Leopoldo Lopez, who was jailed last year on charges that he promoted the violence, believes in "toppling the government," a nondemocratic option popularly known as la salida (the way out).
The problem is that the same politicians will suddenly drop their rhetoric and support nondemocratic solutions if the occasion calls for it.
Our identification assumption is that democratization in a country spreads to other nondemocratic countries in the same region, but does not have a direct differential impact on economic growth in these countries, at least conditional on lagged levels of country and regional GDP and various covariates that could be correlated with country-level GDP at the year, region, and initial regime level.
Can constitutions with nondemocratic elements, and even monarchical elements, be effective at restraining majoritarian and autocratic abuses?
He termed Arbab Rahim and Liaquat Jatoi as a product of martial law and their philosophy as nondemocratic.
Although participatory political culture is an essential element in the transition to democracy in nondemocratic countries and the strengthening of democratic countries, however, there is no doubt that they originate from different roots and bases characterized with strengths or weakens.
It was an argument that went up in smoke months later when The Washington Post reported that not one of the 10 presidents were elected; all had come to power in coups or through other nondemocratic means.
He said the government could deal with such nondemocratic and political aggression in the same coin but it believes in democratic norms and exercised the policy of restraint, patience and peace.
Democratic states and nondemocratic states arguably behave differently in the realm of foreign policy.
The Qatar controversy illustrates the risk both potential hosts groups such as world football governing body FIFA and the International Olympic Committee shoulder with the awarding of tournaments to nondemocratic or authoritarian-run nations.
In particular, if we could look at the lens of political thought in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries through another ancient political thinker such as Plutarch (a Greek living under Roman imperial rule), we would find both a source and a tradition for seeking to harness a deep sense of the public good and public service to nondemocratic and nonegalitarian conditions and institutions, a position articulated also many times in earlier humanist thought, though perhaps not with the same twist as with Ferguson's call for civil-military union.