nonfatty

nonfatty

(ˌnɒnˈfætɪ)
adj
not fatty, not characterized by or composed of fat
References in periodicals archive ?
Having dense breasts means having more nonfatty tissues than fatty tissues, so they make it harder for mammograms to detect breast cancer.
Sometimes a layer of hard fat, called the deckle, is present between the two muscles on the nonfatty side.
The women were requested to fast or eat a light, nonfatty breakfast no later than 2 hr before the blood sampling.
25) Lipomas are usually easily discernible from nonfatty lesions, as they characteristically demonstrate T1 and T2 hyperintensity, with signal dropout on fat-saturated sequences.
The PVDF membrane was blocked in 5% (w/v) nonfatty milk powder in Tris-buffered saline (TBS, 10 mm Tris, and 100 mm NaCl) containing 0.
These may include high signal intensity villous or nodular foci on both T1-and T2-weighted images that are suppressed on short tau inversion recovery (STIR) or fat saturation sequences, while the remaining nonfatty component of the hypertrophied synovium displays heterogeneous high signal intensity on T2 or STIR sequences and intermediate-to-low signal intensity on T1-weighted sequences.
sup][20] included 466 nonfatty solid renal masses to evaluate the clinico-radio-pathologic features of a solitary solid renal mass at MDCT examination and concluded that MDCT accuracy for detection of RCC was 94%.
The higher digestibility coefficients in lipid-supplemented animals can be attributed the fact that nonfatty acids lipids in the diet (likely approximately 1% of DM) are relatively indigestible, and diluting this fraction (waxes, etc.
While dedifferentiated liposarcomas on CT and MRI imaging, have areas with attenuation and signal intensity characteristic of fat, like well-differentiated liposarcoma but they have areas of nonfatty masses with higher attenuation and low signal intensity on T1-weighted and high signal intensity on T2-weighted.
In women with dense or nonfatty tissue, however, detection can be difficult and additional screening may be needed.
Many nonfatty organic acids, including acetic to decanoic acid and L-lactic, citric, malic, and glycolic acids, are classified as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) compounds by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and have common acceptance for use in the food industry as acidulants and flavor enhancers.
A 1998 study that looked at hepatic resection for cancer showed a 3% mortality rate for those with nonfatty livers.