nonfiction novel


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nonfiction novel

n.
A factual or historical narrative written in the form of a novel: Truman Capote's In Cold Blood is a nonfiction novel.
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Brashear re-imagines the circumstances surrounding the murder, made famous by Truman Capote's award-winning nonfiction novel, In Cold Blood (1966).
Noviembre is, in fact, a truly powerful work in the tradition of the nonfiction novel genre.
The crowded, makeshift, lawless swamp Boo captured in her nonfiction novel "Behind the Beautiful Forevers" looks positively idyllic in Rufus Norris' staging: sun-soaked, colorful and even, on occasion, bedecked with fairy lights.
1) According to Capote, his volume exemplifies a new literary class, the nonfiction novel.
In books like this Mailer helped invent the nonfiction novel, and pioneered the introduction of novelistic devices and a subjective persona into journalism.
In the tradition of Capote and O'Neill, Boardinghouse Stew is Eileen's nonfiction novel, originally released in the 1980s as a headline-grabbing stage play of the same name.
If, however, we approach the work as a nonfiction novel with techniques influenced by several works of fiction (including Brideshead), we experience the work in quite a different manner.
She is the author of the World War II nonfiction novel "In the Claw of the Tiger," based on the story of Athol native Franklin "Porky" LaCoste, who survived the Bataan Death March.
Toby Jones stars as author Truman Capote, who sets out to write a nonfiction novel about the murder of a Kansas family.
Shortly after Capote's novel appeared in print, Eliot Fremont-Smith lamented that "the author is now concerned that 'In Cold Blood' be taken as an example of a new literary form, 'the nonfiction novel.
After noticing a news item in November 1959 about the murders of a Kansas farm family, Capote spent the next six years researching In Cold Blood, perhaps the first nonfiction novel of the nascent "new journalism" movement.
Too often the nonfiction novel, whether in Larson's hands, Capote's, or another's, fails in this regard, as its practitioners commit themselves to offering accounts true to life without an adequate consideration of the deeper truths that their telling brings to light.