nonheroic

nonheroic

(ˌnɒnhɪˈrəʊɪk)
adj
lacking heroism
References in periodicals archive ?
By representing his nonheroic characters with all their faults and virtues, and in fragmented form, Ruffato casts them in a non-romanticized, humanizing light, "without the aesthetization of misery" (Lehnen 25).
True, the House of Israel abides even if the temple does not, and the seemingly miraculous fact of its survival has certainly strengthened many nonheroic individuals.
Withholding Al Harris's Jewish significance equates to removing a nonheroic instance of the problematic "culturally loaded figure of the Jewish pervert.
They write: "Where the heroic critic corrects the text, a nonheroic critic might aim instead to correct for her critical subjectivity, by using machines to bypass it, in the hopes that doing so will produce more accurate knowledge about texts" (2009, 17).
Such projects work modestly with the commonplace, seeking to claim public space for everyday citizens through nonheroic means.
Another indication that, whereas Noah was incidental to his covenant with God, Abraham was a full-fledged partner, is that Abraham's spiritual stature dwarfs Noah, who emerges as a passive, nonheroic character noteworthy only by virtue of his being saved from the Flood .
1027: The Nonheroic Modernism of Eileen Gray," The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 53, 3 (September 1994), 279.
A term of public service that would include such nonheroic jobs as helping to care for the old and the sick: "By asking them to make sacrifices we are reminding them that they owe a debt, even as the juggler felt a debt to Our Lady.
Rich in obsessively researched historical detail, the mammoth, nearly 1,000-page book also takes the time and space to create richly imagined, thoroughly realistic and resolutely nonheroic characters that come vividly to life.
Don Quixote--with its hero journeying through a decidedly nonheroic landscape of everyday life; with the abundant cruelty that Don Quixote encounters; with the resilience with which he picks himself up after defeats and drubbings and continues to his next adventure that seems at first glance only loosely connected to what has come before--is itself heavily indebted to the picaresque narrative.
And, of course, if one applies the biblical story of the Garden of Eden to The Wild Palms, one sees instantly that just as Eve (as seductress) is traditionally thought (by some) to have brought down Adam, so, too, could one argue that it is Charlotte who brings down (the singularly nonheroic, non-Adamic) Wilbourne, an interpretation that will remind Borges scholars of one of his later stories, "La intrusa" ("The [female] Intruder").
Baldwin compares Conrad's text to Primo Levi's The Monkey's Wrench to claim that both enlist comedy as a way of "celebrating the diminutive in a precarious world," subverting traditional notions of heroism--notions that supported imperialism's claims--and anticipating the role of the nonheroic in twenty-first-century literature.