nonphonetic

nonphonetic

(ˌnɒnfəˈnɛtɪk)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics not phonetic
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reflecting YIVO's commitment to developing a proper standardized Yiddish, the Terminological Commission began work in October 1925, concerning itself with establishing a proper Yiddish vocabulary for all aspects of life, work, and science, as well as setting down norms of spelling (in the end, the commission opposed the Soviet standard that eliminated traditional, nonphonetic norms for the spelling of words taken from Hebrew).
The Chinese education system is very hard to compare with ours because their system of writing is completely nonphonetic.
However, he contends that inscription is something without which the relationship between word and world would become chaotic: "What writing itself, in its nonphonetic moment, betrays, is life.
As he says in of Grammatology, "[w]hat writing itself, in its nonphonetic moment, betrays, is life" (Derrida, 1974, 25/40).
Can we help people who do not know or who have difficulty remembering the pronunciation of nonphonetic words?
One study, Guyer & Sabatino (1989), placed college students with LD on a "modified" O-G program and compared their progress to those exposed to a nonphonetic approach.
The following were among the study's implications: (1) adult literacy centers should consider offering different approaches to accommodate the needs of different kinds of intermediate readers; (2) teachers must know not only the phonics principles adult learners appear to have mastered but also those that they use automatically when they read; (3) future research should analyze both phonetically regular and nonphonetic words; and (4) a more refined error classification system could be beneficial.
I wonder if the same correlation would hold for speakers of more phonetically spelled languages like Spanish or Japanese, or for reading and writing Chinese, which is completely nonphonetic.
Over a century of critical and scholarly discussions of inconsistency at each of these levels of the representation of dialect has led to the widespread acceptance of two important "rules" governing the use of dialect in fiction: the first is that literary dialect, because it is based on the altering of a nonphonetic writing system (standard English) will be, even in its most elaborate state, an approximate and imprecise representation of speech sounds.
They profit from building a base of phonetically regular words before learning nonphonetic sight words (Greene, 1993).
That is to say, to read Chinese characters as "shorthand pictures of the operations of nature" is only to misread them, and the presence of a phonetic element in the majority of Chinese characters immensely complicates matters to such a degree that it is no longer meaningful to talk about the difference between the Chinese and Western languages in terms of a neat contrast between natural and conventional signs, or nonphonetic and phonetic writings.