nonrelative

nonrelative

(ˌnɒnˈrɛlətɪv)
n
(Philosophy) philosophy a concept that is not relative
adj
(Philosophy) philosophy that is not relative (to something else)
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The application must include at least one signed letter of recommendation from a nonrelative who is familiar with your goals and aptitude and a one-page, 300- to 400-word typed essay using 12-point font (do not include your name or any identifiers).
Kim wields a singular clout that cannot be matched by any nonrelative members of the elite, regardless of their official titles, according to North Korea analysts.
H2: The likelihood of maintaining a discussant is higher when the discussant is a relative than when the discussant is a nonrelative.
In spite of that, a nonrelative increase was observed in SOD and GSH-Px activities.
Sean Stewart is apparently hoping that a jury hearing his ongoing insider trading trial will be moved that his relevant conversations were with his father--as opposed to a nonrelative.
Not an insured: nonresident, nonrelative vacationing tenants.
Instead, the newer version of ecumenical expressivism has resources for a nonrelative theory of fundamental normative credences that can define an interval from zero to one, independently of the agent's other motives, and do so in a principled way for each fundamental normative proposition that the agent has a view about.
Explore possible relative and nonrelative placements to make sure that the survivor is safe from the trafficker.
Moreover, to be "an insured" the nonrelative resident must have an insurable interest.
The range of relationships was categorized into young adults listed as the reference person, child of the reference person, relative, or nonrelative (reference person; child; relative; nonrelative).
Census Bureau report, children 5 years old and under were more likely to be cared for by a relative (42 percent) than by a nonrelative (33 percent), while 12 percent were regularly cared for by both, and 39 percent had no regular child care arrangement.
Defined as twenty-four-hour substitute care for children outside their own homes, foster care is provided in a variety of settings, including nonrelative foster family homes, relative (kinship) foster homes, group homes, and residential facilities.