nonruminant


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nonruminant

(ˌnɒnˈruːmɪnənt)
adj
(Zoology) not a ruminant
n
(Animals) an animal that is not a ruminant
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.nonruminant - not ruminant
ruminant - related to or characteristic of animals of the suborder Ruminantia or any other animal that chews a cud; "ruminant mammals"
References in periodicals archive ?
1985: A nutritional explanation for body-size patterns of ruminant and nonruminant herbivores.
Two new barley varieties are good for growers, the environment, and nonruminant animals.
Board-Invited Review: Opportunities and challenges in using exogenous enzymes to improve nonruminant animal production.
Feed processing that combines shear forces, heat, residence time, and water may result in partial protein denaturation (13) and may result in changes in protein and other nutrient availability to a nonruminant animal.
The amount of TFAs in the meat of nonruminant animals is generally low [17] and is dependent on the presence of TFAS in the feeds.
Infected grain may contain fungus-produced toxic substances called mycotoxins (vomitoxin), which may cause vomiting in nonruminant animals and humans.
Hemicellulose utilization by microorganisms in the alimentary tract of ruminal and nonruminant animal.
The first volume covers amino acids; aquaculture chemicals; bakery processes and chemical leavening agents; beer and brewing; distilled beverage spirits; carbohydrates; carbonated beverages; chocolate and cocoa; citric acid; coffee; colorants for food; dairy substitutes; dietary fiber; eggs; emulsions; fat replacers; fats and fatty oils; ruminant, nonruminant, and pet feeds and feed additives; fermentation; fish and shellfish products; flavor characterization; flavor delivery systems; flavors; food additives; food processing; food safety, chemical contaminants, and toxins; naturally occurring food toxicants; nonconventional foods; fruit juices; fruit preserves and jellies; gelatin; gums; and lecithin.
Activity in the abomasums of the ruminant is similar to the stomach in the nonruminant.
Horses are nonruminant herbivores who use carbohydrates for their main energy supply.
Phytic acid also binds to nutritionally important minerals, particularly Zn, making them unavailable to humans and nonruminant livestock (Thompson, 1989; Raboy et al.