nonsensicality


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non·sen·si·cal

 (nŏn-sĕn′sĭ-kəl)
adj.
1. Lacking intelligible meaning: a nonsensical jumble of words.
2. Foolish; absurd: nonsensical ideas.

non·sen′si·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), non·sen′si·cal·ness (-kəl-nĭs) n.
non·sen′si·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nonsensicality - a message that seems to convey no meaningnonsensicality - a message that seems to convey no meaning
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
absurdity, absurdness, ridiculousness - a message whose content is at variance with reason
amphigory, nonsense verse - nonsensical writing (usually verse)
balderdash, fiddle-faddle, piffle - trivial nonsense
buzzword, cant - stock phrases that have become nonsense through endless repetition
cobblers - nonsense; "I think that is a load of cobblers"
crock - nonsense; foolish talk; "that's a crock"
fa la, fal la - meaningless syllables in the refrain of a partsong
gibber, gibberish - unintelligible talking
unintelligibility, incoherence, incoherency - nonsense that is simply incoherent and unintelligible
jabberwocky - nonsensical language (according to Lewis Carroll)
mummery, flummery - meaningless ceremonies and flattery
empty talk, empty words, hot air, palaver, rhetoric - loud and confused and empty talk; "mere rhetoric"
rigamarole, rigmarole - a set of confused and meaningless statements
schmegegge, shmegegge - (Yiddish) baloney; hot air; nonsense
hooey, poppycock, stuff and nonsense, stuff - senseless talk; "don't give me that stuff"
baloney, bilgewater, boloney, bosh, drool, humbug, tommyrot, tosh, twaddle, taradiddle, tarradiddle - pretentious or silly talk or writing
References in periodicals archive ?
By combining the actors' exaggerated gesturing with pitched-up, repetitive musical sound tracks, Beckman gives her works the psychotic energy and seeming nonsensicality of a fever dream.
Then to the tribal games, which to the assembled crowd, especially the Africans, were an astonishing show of nonsensicality.
In a passage of stunning nonsensicality (one of several throughout the opinion), Crotty writes: "The statute [under review in the case] imposes a heavy burden: it requires Professor Ramadan to prove a negative, and to do so by clear and convincing proof.