nonstationary

nonstationary

(ˌnɒnˈsteɪʃənərɪ)
adj
1. not stationary; in motion
2. (Mathematics) maths (of a random process in probability theory) of which the probability distribution alters with alterations in time or space
References in periodicals archive ?
Clive had considered nonstationary time series earlier, and as a precursor to his work on cointegration he and Paul Newbold (Journal of Econometrics, 1974) had regressed two independent nonstationary variables [x.
This article defines what we mean by nonstationary root causes of program failures, and identifies 10 such causes.
the APM and program-technical means (PTM) of DMS tactical level functioning for forming and current correction of technological schedule of the TPBV in conditions of nonstationary external disturbances are developed and tested;
Unlike roads and bridges, rivers and streams are nonstationary entities and can move in four dimensions: One is temporal (flow volumes change seasonally and due to weather events), and three are spatial (lateral or cross section, longitudinal or up- and downstream, and elevation or depth).
To determine the above mentioned curve stress, limited loading would be analyzed as nonstationary strain limited loading where for the whole process of deformation up to crack initiation, the following should be written:
Movement causes acceleration that produces deflection in the nonstationary electrode.
The finished goods inventory time series is a nonstationary process.
Many macroeconomic variables in their levels are nonstationary and are stationary in their first differences (Nelson and Plossner, 1982).
In the discretization of nonstationary problems, one often uses the space semidiscretization, also called the method of lines.
If these variables are nonstationary and have the same order of integration, they can be constructed into a cointegration model.
In nonstationary time series, a vector autoregressive (VAR) form is indicated in equation (2).
Since these data are nonstationary, cointegration is the superior econometric method to capture both the long-run and short-run movements in the variables.