euthanasia

(redirected from nonvoluntary euthanasia)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

eu·tha·na·sia

 (yo͞o′thə-nā′zhə, -zhē-ə)
n.
The act or practice of ending the life of a person or animal having a terminal illness or a medical condition that causes suffering perceived as incompatible with an acceptable quality of life, as by lethal injection or the suspension of certain medical treatments.

[Greek euthanasiā, a good death : eu-, eu- + thanatos, death.]

euthanasia

(ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə) or

euthanasy

n
(Medicine) the act of killing someone painlessly, esp to relieve suffering from an incurable illness. Also called: mercy killing
[C17: via New Latin from Greek: easy death, from eu- + thanatos death]

eu•tha•na•sia

(ˌyu θəˈneɪ ʒə, -ʒi ə, -zi ə)

n.
Also called mercy killing. the act of putting to death painlessly or allowing to die, as by withholding medical measures from a person or animal suffering from an incurable, esp. a painful, disease or condition.
[1640–50; < New Latin < Greek euthanasía easy death]

euthanasia

1. the act of putting to death without pain a person incurably ill or suffering great pain; mercy killing.
2. an easy, painless death. — euthanasic, adj.
See also: Killing
the deliberate killing of painfully ill or terminally ill people to put them out of their misery. Also called mercy killing.
See also: Death
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)euthanasia - the act of killing someone painlessly (especially someone suffering from an incurable illness)
kill, putting to death, killing - the act of terminating a life

euthanasia

noun mercy killing, assisted suicide the emotive question of whether euthanasia should be legalized
Translations
إماتَه رَحيمَه
eutanasimedlidenhedsdrab
eutanázia
líknardráp
eutanazijaneskausmingas numarinimas
eitanāzija
eutanázia
ötenazitatlı ölüm

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] Neutanasia f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪziə] neuthanasie f

euthanasia

nEuthanasie f

euthanasia

[ˌjuːθəˈneɪzɪə] neutanasia

euthanasia

(juːθəˈneiziə) noun
the painless killing of someone who is suffering from a painful and incurable illness. Many old people would prefer euthanasia to the suffering they have to endure.

eu·tha·na·si·a

n. eutanasia, muerte infringida sin sufrimiento en casos de una enfermedad incurable.

euthanasia

n eutanasia
References in periodicals archive ?
If such individuals were also clearly suffering terribly, and nothing short of death or complete unconsciousness would alleviate their misery, then unless they had previously (while competent) stated preferences to the contrary, perhaps nonvoluntary euthanasia might be regarded as merciful and right.
It does not distinguish between voluntary euthanasia (legal in the Netherlands and Belgium), nonvoluntary euthanasia (of a patient no longer capable of expressing his wishes or of giving legal consent), and involuntary euthanasia (against the patient's wishes).
Provided the proxies for this individual act in the patient's best interest rather than their own, I can easily imagine morally permissible examples of nonvoluntary euthanasia.
They also rejected nonvoluntary euthanasia by 94 per cent to six per cent.
The bottom line is that nonvoluntary euthanasia, in the form of denial of lifesaving medical treatment, food, and fluids to patients who cannot speak for themselves and have never expressed their wishes, is now the legal norm in most of this country.
21) He was most wary of a slippery slope leading to nonvoluntary euthanasia, remarking in 1958: "Miss Voluntary Euthanasia is not likely to be going it alone for very long.
If apologists for the status quo fear that a slippery slope will lead to voluntary euthanasia, then nonvoluntary euthanasia, the proponents of change already know that we've been on a slippery slope of inadequate management of suffering for decades.
Because this directive would be carried out without further consideration of the patient's wishes once she reached that stage, this proposal ventures into the territory of nonvoluntary euthanasia, and possibly involuntary euthanasia (in cases where the now-incompetent Alzheimer's patient appears to be relatively content).