noontide


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Related to noontide: noontime

noon·tide

 (no͞on′tīd′)
n.
See noon.

noon•tide

(ˈnunˌtaɪd)

n.
1. the time of noon; midday.
2. the highest or best point or part.
[before 1000; Middle English nonetyde, Old English nōntīd]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.noontide - the middle of the daynoontide - the middle of the day    
24-hour interval, day, mean solar day, solar day, twenty-four hour period, twenty-four hours - time for Earth to make a complete rotation on its axis; "two days later they left"; "they put on two performances every day"; "there are 30,000 passengers per day"
time of day, hour - clock time; "the hour is getting late"
References in classic literature ?
And once again shall ye have become friends unto me, and children of one hope: then will I be with you for the third time, to celebrate the great noontide with you.
And it is the great noontide, when man is in the middle of his course between animal and Superman, and celebrateth his advance to the evening as his highest hope: for it is the advance to a new morning.
At such time will the down-goer bless himself, that he should be an over- goer; and the sun of his knowledge will be at noontide.
Man's little Day in haste we spend, And, from its merry noontide, send No glance to meet the silent end.
TWAS noontide of summer, And midtime of night, And stars, in their orbits, Shone pale, through the light Of the brighter, cold moon.
One will pass all the hours of the night seated at the foot of some oak or rock, and there, without having closed his weeping eyes, the sun finds him in the morning bemused and bereft of sense; and another without relief or respite to his sighs, stretched on the burning sand in the full heat of the sultry summer noontide, makes his appeal to the compassionate heavens, and over one and the other, over these and all, the beautiful Marcela triumphs free and careless.
There happened to be visible, at the same noontide hour, so many other characteristics of the times and manners of the Puritans, that we must endeavor to represent them in a sketch, though far less vividly than they were reflected in the polished breastplate of John Endicott.
After a long and harassing day's march, without pausing for a noontide meal, they were compelled, at nine o'clock at night, to encamp in an open plain, destitute of water or pasturage.
By the close of the month the weather became very mild, and, heavily burdened as they were, they found the noontide temperature uncomfortably warm.
Though the arts of peace were unknown to this fatal region, its forests were alive with men; its shades and glens rang with the sounds of martial music, and the echoes of its mountains threw back the laugh, or repeated the wanton cry, of many a gallant and reckless youth, as he hurried by them, in the noontide of his spirits, to slumber in a long night of forgetfulness.
The commonplace characteristics--which, at noontide, it seemed to have taken a century of sordid life to accumulate--were now transfigured by a charm of romance.
Let him hear shrieks in the morning and battle shouts at noontide Because he did not kill me before birth so that my mother might be my grave, and her womb big [with me] for all time.