nose out


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nose

 (nōz)
n.
1. The part of the human face or the forward part of the head of other vertebrates that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract.
2. The sense of smell: a dog with a good nose.
3. The ability to detect, sense, or discover as if by smell: has a nose for gossip.
4. The characteristic smell of a wine or liqueur; bouquet.
5. Informal The nose considered as a symbol of prying: Keep your nose out of my business.
6. Something, such as the forward end of an aircraft, rocket, or submarine, that resembles a nose in shape or position.
7. A very short distance or narrow margin: won the race by a nose.
v. nosed, nos·ing, nos·es
v.tr.
1. To find out by or as if by smell: nosed out the thieves' hiding place.
2. To touch with the nose; nuzzle.
3. To move, push, or make with or as if with the nose.
4. To advance the forward part of cautiously: nosed the car into the flow of traffic.
v.intr.
1. To smell or sniff.
2. Informal To search or inquire meddlesomely; snoop or pry: nosing around looking for opportunities.
3. To advance with caution: The ship nosed into its berth.
Phrasal Verb:
nose out
To defeat by a narrow margin.
Idioms:
down (one's) nose Informal
With disapproval, contempt, or arrogance: Year-round residents here look down their noses at the summer people.
on the nose
Exactly; precisely: predicted the final score on the nose.
under (someone's) nose
In plain view: The keys are right under your nose.

[Middle English, from Old English nosu; see nas- in Indo-European roots.]

nose out

vb (tr, adverb)
1. to discover by smelling
2. to discover by cunning or persistence: the reporter managed to nose out a few facts.
3. informal to beat by a narrow margin: he was nosed out of first place by the champion.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.nose out - recognize or detect by or as if by smellingnose out - recognize or detect by or as if by smelling; "He can smell out trouble"

nose

noun
1. The structure on the human face that contains the nostrils and organs of smell and forms the beginning of the respiratory tract:
Informal: beak, snoot.
2. The sense by which odors are perceived:
verb
1. To perceive with the olfactory sense:
Idiom: catch a whiff of.
2. Informal. To look into or inquire about curiously, inquisitively, or in a meddlesome fashion.Also used with around:
Idiom: stick one's nose into.
phrasal verb
nose out
To pursue and locate:
Idiom: run to earth.
Translations
يَجِد بواسِطَة الشَّم والرائِحَه
vyčenichatvyslídit
opsnuse
òefa uppi
koklayarak bulmak

w>nose out

vt sep (Brit inf) → aufspüren; secret, scandalausspionieren (inf), → ausschnüffeln (inf)
vi (car)sich vorschieben

nose

(nəuz) noun
1. the part of the face by which people and animals smell and usually breathe. She held the flower to her nose; He punched the man on the nose.
2. the sense of smell. Police dogs have good noses and can follow criminals' trails.
3. the part of anything which is like a nose in shape or position. the nose of an aeroplane.
verb
1. to make a way by pushing carefully forward. The ship nosed (its way) through the ice.
2. to look or search as if by smelling. He nosed about (in) the cupboard.
-nosed
a long-nosed dog.
ˈnos(e)y adjective
taking too much interest in other people and what they are doing. She is a very nos(e)y person.
ˈnosily adverb
ˈnosiness noun
ˈnose-bag noun
food-bag for horses, hung over the head.
ˈnosedive noun
a dive or fall with the head or nose first. The aeroplane did a nosedive into the sea.
ˈnose job noun
plastic surgery on the nose.
verb
to make such a dive. Suddenly the plane nosedived.
follow one's nose
to go straight forward.
lead by the nose
to make (a person) do whatever one wants.
nose out
to find (as if) by smelling. The dog nosed out its master's glove.
pay through the nose
to pay a lot, or too much.
turn up one's nose at
to treat with contempt. He turned up his nose at the school dinner.
under (a person's) (very) nose
right in front of (a person). The book was right under my very nose; He stole the money from under my very nose.