nostril


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nos·tril

 (nŏs′trəl)
n.
Either of the external openings of the nose; a naris.

[Middle English nostrille, from Old English nosthyrl : nosu, nose; see nas- in Indo-European roots + thyrl, hole; see terə- in Indo-European roots.]

nostril

(ˈnɒstrɪl)
n
1. (Anatomy) either of the two external openings of the nose.
2. (Zoology) either of the two external openings of the nose.
[Old English nosthyrl, from nosu nose + thyrel hole]

nos•tril

(ˈnɒs trəl)

n.
either of the two external openings of the nose.
[before 1000; Middle English nostrill, Old English nosterl, nosthyrl=nos(u) nose + thyrel hole; see thirl]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nostril - either one of the two external openings to the nasal cavity in the nosenostril - either one of the two external openings to the nasal cavity in the nose
nose, olfactory organ - the organ of smell and entrance to the respiratory tract; the prominent part of the face of man or other mammals; "he has a cold in the nose"
naris - any of the openings to the nasal cavities that allow air to flow through the cavities to the pharynx

nostril

noun
Related words
technical name naris
adjectives narial, narine
Translations
فَتْحَةُ الْأًنْفِمِنْخَر، فُتْحَة الأنْف
nozdranosní dírka
næsebor
sierain
nosnicanozdrva
orrlyuk
nös, nasahola
鼻の穴
콧구멍
šnervė
nāss
nozdra
nosnica
näsborre
รูจมูก
lỗ mũi

nostril

[ˈnɒstrɪl] N (Anat) [of person, dog, lion] → ventana f de la nariz, orificio m nasal (frm); [of horse] → ollar m
nostrilsnarices fpl

nostril

[ˈnɒstrəl] n [person] → narine f; [horse] → naseau m

nostril

nNasenloch nt; (of horse, zebra etc)Nüster f

nostril

[ˈnɒstrl] nnarice f; (of horse) → frogia

nostril

(ˈnostril) noun
one of the two openings in the nose through which one breathes, smells etc.

nostril

فَتْحَةُ الْأًنْفِ nosní dírka næsebor Nasenloch ρουθούνι ventana de la nariz sierain narine nosnica narice 鼻の穴 콧구멍 neusgat nesebor nozdrze narina ноздря näsborre รูจมูก burun deliği lỗ mũi 鼻孔

nos·tril

n. naris, fosa nasal, ventana o ala de la nariz.

nostril

n fosa or orificio nasal
References in classic literature ?
But few thoughts of Pan stirred Ahab's brain, as standing like an iron statue at his accustomed place beside the mizen rigging, with one nostril he unthinkingly snuffed the sugary musk from the Bashee isles (in whose sweet woods mild lovers must be walking), and with the other consciously inhaled the salt breath of the new found sea; that sea in which the hated White Whale must even then be swimming.
I should say," said Ginger, curling her nostril, "that these men, who are so wise, had better give orders that in the future all foals should be born with their eyes set just in the middle of their foreheads, instead of on the side; they always think they can improve upon nature and mend what God has made.
And he held one nostril and blew with the other at the two regiments; they were separated and blown away in the blue sky over the mountains, one this way, and the other that.
The other nostril being closed by a peculiar movement of the muscles about the nose, the breath is forced into the tube, and produces a soft dulcet sound which is varied by the fingers running at random over the stops.
Not a muscle quivered; nor was there the slightest dilation of a nostril, nor the slightest increase of light in the eyes.
He sought and found a wide game trail and at last his nostrils were rewarded with the scent of the fresh spoor of Bara, the deer.
Many lands have I seen, my nose hath learned to test and estimate many kinds of air: but with thee do my nostrils taste their greatest delight!
Her clean-cut head with prominent, bright, spirited eyes, broadened out at the open nostrils, that showed the red blood in the cartilage within.
To its sensitive nostrils came the subtle unseen spoor of many a tender four-footed creature, bringing the slaver of hunger to the cruel, drooping jowl.
The Gnat, having sounded his horn, fastened himself upon the Lion and stung him on the nostrils and the parts of the face devoid of hair.
And so the Ship of Fools sailed on, all aft fooling and befouling, from the guileless-eyed, gentle-souled Finnish mate, who, with the scent of treasure pungent in his nostrils, with a duplicate key stole the ship's daily position from Captain Doane's locked desk, to Ah Moy, the cook, who kept Kwaque at a distance and never whispered warning to the others of the risk they ran from continual contact with the carrier of the terrible disease.
She opened her nostrils and inhaled with a mystic sensuousness; then she closed her lids.