notoriety


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no·to·ri·e·ty

 (nō′tə-rī′ĭ-tē)
n.
The quality or condition of being notorious. See Usage Note at notorious.

no•to•ri•e•ty

(ˌnoʊ təˈraɪ ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state or quality of being notorious.
2. Chiefly Brit. a notorious person.
[1585–95; < Medieval Latin nōtōrietās <nōtōri(us) notorious]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.notoriety - the state of being known for some unfavorable act or quality
infamy - evil fame or public reputation
reputation - notoriety for some particular characteristic; "his reputation for promiscuity"

notoriety

noun infamy, discredit, disrepute, dishonour, bad reputation, opprobrium, ill repute, obloquy The team's fans have acquired notoriety as being among the worst hooligans in the country.

notoriety

noun
1. Unfavorable, usually unsavory renown:
2. Wide recognition for one's deeds:
Translations
شُهْرَة ٌبِسوء السُّمْعَه
notoričnost
berygtethed
hírhedtségközismertség
illur orîstír, óorî
notorickosť
dile düşmüşlükkötü şöhret

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪətɪ] Nmala fama f, mala reputación f
to achieve or gain notorietyadquirir mala fama or reputación

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪəti] nnotoriété f

notoriety

notoriety

[ˌnəʊtəˈraɪətɪ] nnotorietà

notorious

(nəˈtoːriəs) adjective
well-known for badness or wickedness. a notorious murderer.
notoriety (noutəˈraiəti) noun
noˈtoriously adverb
References in classic literature ?
This event made Fuchs the object of undeserved notoriety, since he was travelling with her.
returned the chief, regarding Heyward with that sort of curious interest which seems inseparable from man, when first beholding one of his fellows to whom merit or accident, virtue or crime, has given notoriety.
Father Mapple enjoyed such a wide reputation for sincerity and sanctity, that I could not suspect him of courting notoriety by any mere tricks of the stage.
The public and shameless sale of beautiful mulatto and quadroon girls has acquired a notoriety, from the incidents following the capture of the Pearl.
Of course I was all the talk -- all other subjects were dropped; even the king became suddenly a per- son of minor interest and notoriety.
Here was a gorgeous triumph; they were missed; they were mourned; hearts were breaking on their account; tears were being shed; accusing memories of unkindness to these poor lost lads were rising up, and unavailing regrets and re- morse were being indulged; and best of all, the depart- ed were the talk of the whole town, and the envy of all the boys, as far as this dazzling notoriety was con- cerned.
They hanged at Tyburn, in those days, so the street outside Newgate had not obtained one infamous notoriety that has since attached to it.
As my notoriety began to bring upon me an enormous quantity of letters from people of whom I had no knowledge - chiefly about nothing, and extremely difficult to answer - I agreed with Traddles to have my name painted up on his door.
The assembled clergy admitted the validity of the plea, and the notoriety of the circumstances upon which it was founded; giving thus an indubitable and most remarkable testimony to the existence of that disgraceful license by which that age was stained.
The first person I asked gave me more in reply than I sought to know; he showed me the house, and told me all that had occurred at the betrothal of the daughter of the family, an affair of such notoriety in the city that it was the talk of every knot of idlers in the street.
would ever remain unknown, for her delicacy shrunk at the publicity and notoriety which would then attend his attachment.
These same Typees enjoy a prodigious notoriety all over the islands.