nourish


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nour·ish

 (nûr′ĭsh)
tr.v. nour·ished, nour·ish·ing, nour·ish·es
1. To provide with food or other substances necessary for life and growth; feed.
2. To foster the development of; promote: "Athens was an imperial city, nourished by the tribute of subjects" (V. Gordon Childe).
3. To keep alive; maintain: nourish a hope.

[Middle English norishen, from Old French norrir, norriss-, from Vulgar Latin *nutrīre, from Latin nūtrīre; see (s)nāu- in Indo-European roots.]

nour′ish·er n.

nourish

(ˈnʌrɪʃ)
vb (tr)
1. (Biology) to provide with the materials necessary for life and growth
2. to support or encourage (an idea, feeling, etc); foster: to nourish resentment.
[C14: from Old French norir, from Latin nūtrīre to feed, care for]
ˈnourisher n
ˈnourishing adj
ˈnourishingly adv

nour•ish

(ˈnɜr ɪʃ, ˈnʌr-)

v.t.
1. to sustain with food or nutriment; supply with what is necessary for life, health, and growth.
2. to cherish; keep alive: to nourish a hope.
3. to strengthen or promote; foster: to nourish the arts.
[1250–1300; Middle English norisshe < Old French noriss-,norir < Latin nūtrīre to feed; compare nurse]
nour′ish•er, n.

nourish

  • alimony - From Latin alimonia, "nourishment" or "eating money," from alere, "to nourish," and mony, "result, resulting condition," it first meant "nourishment, support."
  • alumnus, alumna, alumni - Alumnus and alumna stem from Latin alere, "to nourish or be nourished," now by a university; originally alumnus was a pupil and now it is a male graduate. Alumni refers to either sex.
  • coalesce - Meaning "cause to grow together," it is from Latin co- and alere, "nourish."
  • nurture - The verb was formed after the noun, which first referred (c. 1330) to a person's training or breeding. The word can be traced back to Latin nutritus, meaning "to nourish."

nourish


Past participle: nourished
Gerund: nourishing

Imperative
nourish
nourish
Present
I nourish
you nourish
he/she/it nourishes
we nourish
you nourish
they nourish
Preterite
I nourished
you nourished
he/she/it nourished
we nourished
you nourished
they nourished
Present Continuous
I am nourishing
you are nourishing
he/she/it is nourishing
we are nourishing
you are nourishing
they are nourishing
Present Perfect
I have nourished
you have nourished
he/she/it has nourished
we have nourished
you have nourished
they have nourished
Past Continuous
I was nourishing
you were nourishing
he/she/it was nourishing
we were nourishing
you were nourishing
they were nourishing
Past Perfect
I had nourished
you had nourished
he/she/it had nourished
we had nourished
you had nourished
they had nourished
Future
I will nourish
you will nourish
he/she/it will nourish
we will nourish
you will nourish
they will nourish
Future Perfect
I will have nourished
you will have nourished
he/she/it will have nourished
we will have nourished
you will have nourished
they will have nourished
Future Continuous
I will be nourishing
you will be nourishing
he/she/it will be nourishing
we will be nourishing
you will be nourishing
they will be nourishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been nourishing
you have been nourishing
he/she/it has been nourishing
we have been nourishing
you have been nourishing
they have been nourishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been nourishing
you will have been nourishing
he/she/it will have been nourishing
we will have been nourishing
you will have been nourishing
they will have been nourishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been nourishing
you had been nourishing
he/she/it had been nourishing
we had been nourishing
you had been nourishing
they had been nourishing
Conditional
I would nourish
you would nourish
he/she/it would nourish
we would nourish
you would nourish
they would nourish
Past Conditional
I would have nourished
you would have nourished
he/she/it would have nourished
we would have nourished
you would have nourished
they would have nourished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.nourish - provide with nourishment; "We sustained ourselves on bread and water"; "This kind of food is not nourishing for young children"
cater, ply, provide, supply - give what is desired or needed, especially support, food or sustenance; "The hostess provided lunch for all the guests"
carry - be able to feed; "This land will carry ten cows to the acre"
2.nourish - give nourishment tonourish - give nourishment to      
feed, give - give food to; "Feed the starving children in India"; "don't give the child this tough meat"

nourish

verb
1. feed, supply, sustain, nurture The food the mother eats nourishes both her and her baby.
2. encourage, support, maintain, promote, sustain, foster, cultivate This attitude has been carefully nourished by a small group of journalists and scholars.
3. cherish, have, hold, entertain, harbour, cling to They continued to nourish hopes of victory.

nourish

verb
1. To sustain (a living organism) with food:
2. To promote and sustain the development of:
3. To hold and turn over in the mind:
Translations
يُغَذّي
vyživovatživit
give næringnære
næra
alere
maistingasmaistingos medžiagos
barotlolot

nourish

[ˈnʌrɪʃ] VT
1. (lit) → alimentar, nutrir
to nourish sb on sthalimentar a algn con algo
2. (fig) → fomentar, nutrir

nourish

[ˈnʌrɪʃ] vt
[+ person, animal, plant] → nourrir
[+ feeling, belief] → entretenir

nourish

vt
(lit)nähren; personernähren; leatherpflegen; a good diet nourished her back to healthgute Ernährung brachte sie wieder zu Kräften
(fig) hopes etcnähren, hegen; literature to nourish their mindsLiteratur als geistige Nahrung
vinahrhaft sein

nourish

[ˈnʌrɪʃ] vtnutrire

nourish

(ˈnariʃ) , ((American) ˈnə:-) verb
to cause or help to grow, become healthy etc.
ˈnourishing adjective
giving the body what is necessary for health and growth. nourishing food.
ˈnourishment noun
something that nourishes; food. Plants draw nourishment from the earth.

nourish

v. alimentar, nutrir, sustentar.

nourish

vt nutrir, alimentar
References in classic literature ?
Me loves evvybody," she once said, opening her arms, with her spoon in one hand, and her mug in the other, as if eager to embrace and nourish the whole world.
After my fellowship of toil and impracticable schemes with the dreamy brethren of Brook Farm; after living for three years within the subtle influence of an intellect like Emerson's; after those wild, free days on the Assabeth, indulging fantastic speculations, beside our fire of fallen boughs, with Ellery Channing; after talking with Thoreau about pine-trees and Indian relics in his hermitage at Walden; after growing fastidious by sympathy with the classic refinement of Hillard's culture; after becoming imbued with poetic sentiment at Longfellow's hearthstone -- it was time, at length, that I should exercise other faculties of my nature, and nourish myself with food for which I had hitherto had little appetite.
I was only a child and could do nothing to protect and nourish it, and there was no one else to stand between it and trouble.
I explained that they were bare masses of stone, with hardly enough earth in their clefts to nourish a stunted tree.
Daughter of God and Man, accomplisht EVE, Those have thir course to finish, round the Earth, By morrow Eevning, and from Land to Land In order, though to Nations yet unborn, Ministring light prepar'd, they set and rise; Least total darkness should by Night regaine Her old possession, and extinguish life In Nature and all things, which these soft fires Not only enlighten, but with kindly heate Of various influence foment and warme, Temper or nourish, or in part shed down Thir stellar vertue on all kinds that grow On Earth, made hereby apter to receive Perfection from the Suns more potent Ray.
The more effectually to nourish discord and disorder the Romans had, to the astonishment of those who confided in their sincerity, already proclaimed universal liberty[1] throughout Greece.
We may be assured by past experience, that such a practice would be introduced by future contrivances; and both by that and a common knowledge of human affairs, that it would nourish unceasing animosities, and not improbably terminate in serious interruptions of the public tranquillity.
Poor food was this to nourish the mental appetite of a girl just upon the brink of womanhood.
Do you think you can live wi'out eatin', an' nourish your inside wi' stickin' red ribbons on your head?
Excuse me, monsieur," said he, "I am, as you are, a traveler; I know no one in the hotel, and I have the bad habit of losing my spirits when I eat alone, so that my repast appears a bad one to me, and does not nourish me.
But we may not take up the third sword, which is Mahomet's sword, or like unto it; that is, to propagate religion by wars, or by sanguinary persecutions to force consciences; except it be in cases of overt scandal, blasphemy, or intermixture of practice against the state; much less to nourish seditions; to authorize conspiracies and rebellions; to put the sword into the people's hands; and the like; tending to the subversion of all government, which is the ordinance of God.
The painful remembrance of the folly it had helped to nourish and perfect was the only emotion which could spring from a consideration of the building.