nourishment


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nour·ish·ment

 (nûr′ĭsh-mənt)
n.
1.
a. The act of nourishing.
b. The state of being nourished.
2. Something that nourishes; food.

nourishment

(ˈnʌrɪʃmənt)
n
1. (Biology) the act or state of nourishing
2. (Biology) a substance that nourishes; food; nutriment

nour•ish•ment

(ˈnɜr ɪʃ mənt, ˈnʌr-)

n.
1. something that nourishes; food; sustenance.
2. the act of nourishing.
3. the state of being nourished.
[1375–1425; late Middle English norysshement < Middle French norissement]

nourishment

  • foster - Comes from the Germanic base for "food" and it originally meant "food, nourishment."
  • inanity, inanition - Inanity is intellectual or spiritual emptiness; inanition is the lack of nourishment.
  • meat - First meant "food, nourishment"—especially solid food as opposed to drink.
  • nourishment - Wine or spirits given medicinally can be called nourishment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nourishment - a source of materials to nourish the bodynourishment - a source of materials to nourish the body
food, nutrient - any substance that can be metabolized by an animal to give energy and build tissue
milk - produced by mammary glands of female mammals for feeding their young
course - part of a meal served at one time; "she prepared a three course meal"
dainty, goody, kickshaw, treat, delicacy - something considered choice to eat
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
fast food - inexpensive food (hamburgers or chicken or milkshakes) prepared and served quickly
finger food - food to be eaten with the fingers
ingesta - solid and liquid nourishment taken into the body through the mouth
kosher - food that fulfills the requirements of Jewish dietary law
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
mess - soft semiliquid food; "a mess of porridge"
mince - food chopped into small bits; "a mince of mushrooms"
puree - food prepared by cooking and straining or processed in a blender
stodge - heavy and filling (and usually starchy) food
wheat germ - embryo of the wheat kernel; removed before milling and eaten as a source of vitamins
vitamin - any of a group of organic substances essential in small quantities to normal metabolism
2.nourishment - the act of nourishing; "her nourishment of the orphans saved many lives"
care, tending, attention, aid - the work of providing treatment for or attending to someone or something; "no medical care was required"; "the old car needs constant attention"

nourishment

noun food, nutrition, sustenance, nutriment, tack (informal), kai (N.Z. informal), victuals, vittles (obsolete or dialect), viands He was unable to take nourishment for several days.

nourishment

noun
2. That which sustains the mind or spirit:
Translations
غِذاء، تَغْذِيَه
jídlovýživa
fødenæring
næring

nourishment

[ˈnʌrɪʃmənt] N
1. (= food) → alimento m
to derive nourishment fromsustentarse de
2. (= nutrition) → nutrición f

nourishment

[ˈnʌrɪʃmənt] nnourriture f

nourishment

n (= food)Nahrung f; to take nourishmentNahrung fzu sich (dat)nehmen; you need some real nourishmentdu brauchst gutes Essen

nourishment

[ˈnʌrɪʃmənt] nnutrimento

nourish

(ˈnariʃ) , ((American) ˈnə:-) verb
to cause or help to grow, become healthy etc.
ˈnourishing adjective
giving the body what is necessary for health and growth. nourishing food.
ˈnourishment noun
something that nourishes; food. Plants draw nourishment from the earth.

nour·ish·ment

n. alimento, nutrición, sustento.

nourishment

n nutrición f, alimentación f
References in classic literature ?
Men who have journeyed since the rising sun, in the shades of this forest, without nourishment, and are sadly tired of their wayfaring.
The lake, as I have hinted, was to a considerable depth exceedingly transparent; and as human infants while suckling will calmly and fixedly gaze away from the breast, as if leading two different lives at the time; and while yet drawing mortal nourishment, be still spiritually feasting upon some unearthly reminiscence; --even so did the young of these whales seem looking up towards us, but not at us, as if we were but a bit of Gulf-weed in their new-born sight.
The founders of every state which has risen to eminence have drawn their nourishment and vigor from a similar wild source.
I have a neat talent in matters pertaining to nourishment.
They looked longingly through the glass, getting some little comfort from the titles of the volumes, as hungry children imbibe emotional nourishment from the pies and tarts inside a confectioner's window.
She played over every favourite song that she had been used to play to Willoughby, every air in which their voices had been oftenest joined, and sat at the instrument gazing on every line of music that he had written out for her, till her heart was so heavy that no farther sadness could be gained; and this nourishment of grief was every day applied.
I would fain exercise some better faculty than that of fierce speaking; fain find nourishment for some less fiendish feeling than that of sombre indignation.
It was a disadvantage to the lad; for the kinder among us did not wish to fret the master, so we humoured his partiality; and that humouring was rich nourishment to the child's pride and black tempers.
They'll die of starvation if they can't be persuaded to take some nourishment.
Yet, human fellowship infused some nourishment into the flinty viands, and struck some sparks of cheerfulness out of them.
These interruptions were of the more ridiculous to me, because she was giving me broth out of a table-spoon at the time (having firmly persuaded herself that I was actually starving, and must receive nourishment at first in very small quantities), and, while my mouth was yet open to receive the spoon, she would put it back into the basin, cry 'Janet
There Joe cut himself short, and informed me that I was to be talked to in great moderation, and that I was to take a little nourishment at stated frequent times, whether I felt inclined for it or not, and that I was to submit myself to all his orders.