novelty


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nov·el·ty

 (nŏv′əl-tē)
n. pl. nov·el·ties
1. The quality of being novel; newness.
2. Something new and unusual; an innovation.
3. A small mass-produced article, such as a toy or trinket.

novelty

(ˈnɒvəltɪ)
n, pl -ties
1.
a. the quality of being new and fresh and interesting
b. (as modifier): novelty value.
2. a new or unusual experience or occurrence
3. (often plural) a small usually cheap new toy, ornament, or trinket
[C14: from Old French novelté; see novel2]

nov•el•ty

(ˈnɒv əl ti)

n., pl. -ties,
adj. n.
1. the state or quality of being novel, new, or unique.
2. a novel occurrence, experience, etc.
3. a small decorative or amusing article, usu. mass-produced.
adj.
4.
a. (of a weave) consisting of a combination of basic weaves.
b. (of a fabric or garment) having a pattern produced by a novelty weave.
c. (of yarn) made of fibers with an irregular or unusual surface, texture, or color.
5. of or pertaining to novelties as articles of trade.
[1350–1400; < Middle French novelete < Late Latin novellitās newness]

Novelty

See also fads.

an abnormal fear of novelty. Also called cainotophobia.
a collection of items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality.
1. the holding of secret doctrines; the practice of limiting knowledge to a small group.
2. an interest in items of a special, rare, novel, or unusual quality. Also esoterism.esoterist, n.
1. the condition of being a griffin, or new arrival from Britain, in India.
2. behavior characteristic of a griffin.
a mania for novelty.
a hatred of novelty. Also called neophobia.
Rare. the worship of novelty. — neolater, n.
philoneism.
misoneism.
an innovator, expecially a coiner of new words.
an excessive love of novelty. Also called neophilism.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novelnovelty - originality by virtue of being refreshingly novel
originality - the quality of being new and original (not derived from something else)
2.novelty - originality by virtue of being new and surprising
originality - the ability to think and act independently
3.novelty - a small inexpensive mass-produced article
article - one of a class of artifacts; "an article of clothing"
4.novelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothingnovelty - cheap showy jewelry or ornament on clothing
adornment - a decoration of color or interest that is added to relieve plainness
trinketry - trinkets and other ornaments of dress collectively

novelty

noun
1. newness, originality, freshness, innovation, surprise, uniqueness, strangeness, unfamiliarity The radical puritanism of Conceptual art and Minimalism had lost its novelty.
2. curiosity, marvel, rarity, oddity, wonder In those days a motor car was still a novelty.
3. trinket, souvenir, memento, bauble, bagatelle, gimcrack, trifle, gewgaw, knick-knack At Easter, we give them plastic eggs filled with small toys, novelties and coins.
Quotations
"A "new thinker", when studied closely, is merely a man who does not know what other people have thought" [F.M. Colby]

novelty

noun
1. The quality of being novel:
2. A new and unusual thing:
3. A small showy article:
Translations
جِدَّةٌ وَغَرابَهشَيءٌ جديد وَغَريبشَيء مُسْتَحْدَث يُباع كتِذْكار
drobnostnezvyklostnovostnovotasuvenýr
det nyepyntetingsouvenir
uutuus
újdonságújszerûségbazáráru
leikföng, minjagripirnÿbreytni, nÿjungnÿjung
drobnosť
alışılmamış şeydeğişiklikucuz ve küçük hediyelik eşyayenilik

novelty

[ˈnɒvəltɪ]
A. N (= quality, thing) → novedad f
once the novelty has worn offcuando pase la novedad
B. CPD novelty value Nnovedad f

novelty

[ˈnɒvəlti] n
(quality of being new and interesting)nouveauté f
Once the novelty has worn off → Une fois passé l'attrait de nouveauté ...
(new and interesting thing or situation)nouveauté f
to be a novelty → être une nouveauté
(= cheap toy or ornament) → gadget m

novelty

n
(= newness)Neuheit f; once the novelty has worn offwenn der Reiz des Neuen or der Neuheit vorbei ist
(= innovation)Neuheit f, → Novum nt; it was quite a noveltydas war etwas ganz Neues, das war ein Novum
(Comm: = trinket) → Krimskrams m

novelty

[ˈnɒvltɪ] n
a. no plnovità
b. (Comm) → oggettino, ninnolo

novel2

(ˈnovəl) adjective
new and strange. a novel idea.
ˈnoveltyplural ˈnovelties noun
1. newness and strangeness. It took her a long time to get used to the novelty of her surroundings.
2. something new and strange. Snow is a novelty to people from hot countries.
3. a small, cheap manufactured thing sold as a toy or souvenir. a stall selling novelties.
References in classic literature ?
The next day was fine, and Meg departed in style for a fortnight of novelty and pleasure.
David had contended, and the novelty of the circumstance held him silent, in deliberation on the propriety of the unusual occurrence.
Somewhat puzzled, slightly annoyed, but enjoying withal the novelty of the environment and the curtness of his reception, Mr.
Whatever might have been his other deficiencies as an escort, Whiskey Dick was a good horseman, and, in spite of his fractious brute, exhibited such skill and confidence as to at once satisfy the young girls of his value to them in the management of their own horses, to whom side-saddles were still an alarming novelty.
Still, there will be a connection with the long past--a reference to forgotten events and personages, and to manners, feelings, and opinions, almost or wholly obsolete --which, if adequately translated to the reader, would serve to illustrate how much of old material goes to make up the freshest novelty of human life.
Some of the briefer articles, which contribute to make up the volume, have likewise been written since my involuntary withdrawal from the toils and honours of public life, and the remainder are gleaned from annuals and magazines, of such antique date, that they have gone round the circle, and come back to novelty again.
At first, the novelty and alarm kept him waking; but his mother so hurriedly repressed every breath or sound, and so assured him that if he were only still she would certainly save him, that he clung quietly round her neck, only asking, as he found himself sinking to sleep,
WHEN I told the king I was going out disguised as a petty freeman to scour the country and familiarize myself with the humbler life of the people, he was all afire with the novelty of the thing in a minute, and was bound to take a chance in the adven- ture himself -- nothing should stop him -- he would drop everything and go along -- it was the prettiest idea he had run across for many a day.
This hotel had a feature which was a decided novelty, and one which might be adopted with advantage by any house which is perched in a commanding situation.
This new interest was a valued novelty in whistling, which he had just acquired from a negro, and he was suffering to practise it un- disturbed.
Certain it was that she was to come; and that Highbury, instead of welcoming that perfect novelty which had been so long promised itMr.
The insipidity of the meeting was exactly such as Elinor had expected; it produced not one novelty of thought or expression, and nothing could be less interesting than the whole of their discourse both in the dining parlour and drawing room: to the latter, the children accompanied them, and while they remained there, she was too well convinced of the impossibility of engaging Lucy's attention to attempt it.