novice


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nov·ice

 (nŏv′ĭs)
n.
1. A person new to a field or activity; a beginner.
2. A person who has entered a religious order but has not yet taken final vows. Also called novitiate.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin novīcius, from Latin, recently entered into a condition, from Latin novus, new; see newo- in Indo-European roots.]

novice

(ˈnɒvɪs)
n
1.
a. a person who is new to or inexperienced in a certain task, situation, etc; beginner; tyro
b. (as modifier): novice driver.
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a probationer in a religious order
3. (General Sporting Terms) a sportsman, esp an oarsman, who has not won a recognized prize, performed to an established level, etc
4. (Horse Racing) a racehorse, esp a steeplechaser or hurdler, that has not won a specified number of races
[C14: via Old French from Latin novīcius, from novus new]

nov•ice

(ˈnɒv ɪs)

n.
1. a person who is new to the circumstances, work, etc., in which he or she is placed; beginner.
2. a person admitted into a religious order or congregation for a period of probation before taking vows.
3. a new member of a church.
[1300–50; < Middle French novice < Medieval Latin novītius convent novice < Latin novīcius newly come into a particular status, derivative of novus new]
nov′ice•hood`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.novice - someone who has entered a religious order but has not taken final vowsnovice - someone who has entered a religious order but has not taken final vows
religious person - a person who manifests devotion to a deity
2.novice - someone new to a field or activitynovice - someone new to a field or activity  
unskilled person - a person who lacks technical training
abecedarian - a novice learning the rudiments of some subject
apprentice, prentice, learner - works for an expert to learn a trade
cub, greenhorn, rookie - an awkward and inexperienced youth
landlubber, landsman, lubber - an inexperienced sailor; a sailor on the first voyage
fledgeling, fledgling, newbie, newcomer, entrant, freshman, neophyte, starter - any new participant in some activity
tenderfoot - an inexperienced person (especially someone inexperienced in outdoor living)
trainee - someone who is being trained

novice

noun
1. beginner, pupil, amateur, newcomer, trainee, apprentice, learner, neophyte, tyro, probationer, newbie (slang), proselyte I'm a novice at these things. You're the professional.
beginner teacher, professional, expert, master, ace, guru, boffin (Brit. informal), old hand, grandmaster, wonk (informal), maven, fundi (S. African), doyen or (fem.) doyenne
2. novitiate She had entered the monastery as a novice many months previously.

novice

noun
1. One who is just starting to learn or do something:
Slang: rookie.
2. An entrant who has not yet taken the final vows of a religious order:
Translations
راهِب مُبْتَدئ في دَيْرمُبْتَدئ في مِهْنَه
nováčeknoviczačátečník
novicenybegynder
aloittelijanoviisivasta-alkaja
apácajelöltpapnövendék
munks-/nunnuefninÿliîi; nÿgræîingur, byrjandi
初心者
novicijus
iesācējsnovicenovicis
nováčiknovic
acemirahip/rahibe adayıyeni

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs]
A. Nprincipiante mf, novato/a m/f (Rel) → novicio/a m/f (Sport) → principiante mf, novato/a m/f
he's no noviceno es ningún principiante
to be a novice at a jobser nuevo en un oficio
B. ADJ a novice painterun pintor principiante, un aspirante a pintor

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs] n
(= inexperienced person) → novice mf
to be a novice at sth → être novice en qch
(RELIGION) (= in monastery, convent) → novice mf

novice

n (Eccl) → Novize m, → Novizin f; (= racehorse) Pferd, das noch nicht eine bestimmte Anzahl von Rennen gewonnen hat; (fig)Neuling m, → Anfänger(in) m(f) (→ at bei, in +dat)

novice

[ˈnɒvɪs] nprincipiante m/f (Rel) → novizio/a

novice

(ˈnovis) noun
1. a beginner in any skill etc.
2. a monk or nun who has not yet taken all his or her vows.

novice

a. principiante, novicio-a.
References in classic literature ?
observing that the pages were numbered, covered only on one side, and not tied up with a ribbon--sure sign of a novice.
The novice in the military art flew from point to point, retarding his own preparations by the excess of his violent and somewhat distempered zeal; while the more practiced veteran made his arrangements with a deliberation that scorned every appearance of haste; though his sober lineaments and anxious eye sufficiently betrayed that he had no very strong professional relish for the, as yet, untried and dreaded warfare of the wilderness.
It gave me no manner of concern that Steerforth should find me a novice in these sciences, but I never could bear to show my want of skill before the respectable Littimer.
But if some intelligent and accomplished friend points out to him, that the difficulties by which he is startled are more in appearance than reality, if, by reading aloud to him, or by reducing the ordinary words to the modern orthography, he satisfies his proselyte that only about one-tenth part of the words employed are in fact obsolete, the novice may be easily persuaded to approach the ``well of English undefiled,'' with the certainty that a slender degree of patience will enable him to enjoy both the humour and the pathos with which old Geoffrey delighted the age of Cressy and of Poictiers.
However, as you are a novice, let us put off the rest until you are seasoned.
So, as a promoter of schemes for the public good, Hubbard was by no means a novice.
It occurred to him that he had not been dubbed a knight, and that according to the law of chivalry he neither could nor ought to bear arms against any knight; and that even if he had been, still he ought, as a novice knight, to wear white armour, without a device upon the shield until by his prowess he had earned one.
I feel like a novice lumbering through a bog in a midst, jumping from one tussock to another in the mere blind effort to move on without knowing where I am going.
Felton, my lad, did you not perceive that you were taken for a novice, and that the first act was being performed of a comedy of which we shall doubtless have the pleasure of following out all the developments?
And now, Raoul," said he, "you are launched; you have dukes for friends, a marshal of France for godfather, a prince of the blood as commander, and on the day of your return you have been received by two queens; it is not so bad for a novice.
The passage up the Hudson furnishes in itself so much to charm the eye of a novice, that none but one under the extraordinary circumstances of our heroine, could have beheld the beauties of the river unmoved.
I will find, or make, an opportunity of speaking to her," I said to myself as I rolled the devoir up; "I will learn what she has of English in her besides the name of Frances Evans; she is no novice in the language, that is evident, yet she told me she had neither been in England, nor taken lessons in English, nor lived in English families.