nucleophilic


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nucleophilic

(ˌnjuːklɪəʊˈfɪlɪk)
adj
(Chemistry) chem having or involving an affinity for positive charge. Nucleophilic reagents (nucleophiles) are molecules, atoms, and ions that behave as electron donors. Compare electrophilic
Translations
nucléophile
References in periodicals archive ?
Objective: "Enzymatic nucleophilic substitution reactions are ubiquitous as key steps in biochemical processes of living cells.
The polymerization occurs through a nucleophilic substitution reaction of DCDPS as difunctional nucleophiles with bisphenol A in dimethyl sulfoxide, DCDPS forms a material called Udel.
This curing temperature is lowered with crosslinking catalysts such as cyclic aliphatic tertiary amine and a heteroaryl or a tertiary nucleophilic organophosphorus compound.
Like curcumin, hirsutanone has an electrophilic [alpha], [beta]-unsaturated ketone in its structure, which can react with nucleophilic groups through a reaction called Michael addition.
The book covers structural features of carbohydrates, including cyclization and conformation preferences and their energetics, then moves on to nucleophilic reaction at the anomeric center, glycoside hydrolysis, and transglycosylation.
E-BODIPY compounds offer the potential for further modification when the substituting nucleophile is an ethynyl group, including nucleophilic addition to and polymerization of the compound at the alkyne site (Goze et al.
Carbon is electrophilic, and oxygen is nucleophilic," says Fontaine.
Their biochemical persistence to nucleophilic attack, low aqueous solubility promote their accumulation in the solid phases of the sediments.
Intimate mechanism of oxidative addition to zerovalent palladium complexes in the presence of halide ions and its relevance to the mechanism of palladium-catalyzed nucleophilic substitutions.
In this review, we discuss the chemical nature of ACR (a soft electrophile) and how this determines the corresponding sites of protein adduction (soft nucleophilic sulfhydryl thiolates on cysteine residues).
Morpholine undergoes most chemical reactions typical for other secondary amines, though the presence of the ether oxygen withdraws electron density from the nitrogen, rendering it less nucleophilic (and less basic) than structurally similar secondary amines such as piperidine.
GABA can also hydrolyze in the body, via a nucleophilic substitution reaction, to GHB (gamma hydroxybutyric acid), which has a strong sedative effect.